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Mile High Endurance Podcast

Mile High Endurance is recorded in the Rocky Mountain front range area in Denver, Colorado. 55 miles to the north is the triathlon 'Mecca' of Boulder, home of some of the most prominent pros in triathlon and related sports. 56 miles to the south is the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. The Olympic Complex in Colorado Springs is the flagship training center for the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Olympic Training Center programs. The 110 mile stretch between Boulder and Colorado Springs is one of the fittest and athletic populated areas in the world. I share these statistics, not so much to brag but to give you the listener context for what the culture and vibe is here in the Mile High area. ​The objective of the Mile High Tri podcast is to connect you to the triathlon community and empower you to achieve your triathlon and fitness goals. Each month we will take subjects that you are interested in and connect your interests with news, expert interviews, and information about services and products in a way that inform your decisions to achieve your full potential in the sport.
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Now displaying: November, 2016
Nov 27, 2016

Welcome to episode #49 of the Mile High Endurance Podcast.  Mile High Endurance is your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance and triathlon goals.   I'm Rich Soares with me ist Khem Suthiwan. 

  • [00:00] Intro 
  • [13:00] Interview with Bob Seebohar
  • [1:11:06] Sweat Rate
  • [1:22:00] 6 Ways to NYC Marathon
  • [1:25:20] Wrap Up

 

Today's interview is with Bob Seebohar.  Bob is Sport Dietitian/Author/Educator.  He is the owner of https://www.enrgperformance.com/ and author of Metabolic Efficiency Training (now in its second edition).

I've been trying to catch up with Bob and this interview is well worth the wait.  In this interview you will hear the many benefits of metabolic efficiency, including reducing the stress on the GI system when training and racing.   We cover a lot of ground in this interview and you will definitely come away from this weekend's interview with some insights into how to improve your general health and race performance.

Nov 20, 2016

Welcome to Episode #48 of the Mile High Endurance podcast.  Mile High Endurance is your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance and triathlon goals.   I'm your host Rich Soares with co-host Khem Suthiwan. 

  • [00:00] Intro 
  • [06:09] David Warden
  • [48:18] Wrap Upn

Today's interview is with coach David Warden.   David is a competitive athlete, retired host of the Tri-Talk Podcast, and a highly respected coach.  He takes a very science-based approach to helping athletes Swim, bike and run faster.   We'll hear more from David shortly.  I'm ready to ease into light training and working on my bio-mechanics.  I suspect that I have room for improvement having seen my Swim Labs videos and feel that I have some flexibility issues that affect my run. This makes the interview with David particularly interesting to us.  Here's the interview.

Intro:

I'd like to introduce coach David Warden.  David is a competitive athlete, retired host of the Tri-Talk Podcast, and owner of David Warden Coaching.  Welcome back onto the show, David! 

A lot of listeners have heard our earlier interviews and many probably used to listen to you.  For those who are newer to the sport or podcasting, would you mind giving a litter review of your resume? 

Before we get in to the interview, I'd like to do a quick follow up to an interview we did 8 months ago.  Do you remember the rapid fire questions?

  • Tubular or Clincher?
  • Compression or No Compression?
  • 1-Piece or 2-Piece?
  • Wax or Shave?
  • Aero or ventilated?
  • Real food carbs or highly processed carbs? 

Questions:

Let me give the listeners a little background on how we landed on this topic.   I get a chance to talk to a lot of people who are new to the sport of triathlon and see themselves doing the sport for at least a few years.  The question I get asked is, where to start?  What is the best thing to focus on early in their triathlon career?  My feeling is the first priority with an athlete, especially a new athlete, is injury prevention through good bio-mechanics.

I know bio-mechanic development is something you have some perspective on, so I'm excited to have you back on to talk about this topic.  One of the things I'd like to do is make sure we have a definition of terms.  The term bio-mechanic development may mean different things to different people.  How do you define the term?

What's the Nature vs. Nurture score for bio-mechanics?  How much control do we have over what we were born with?

Last week we spoke to Dr. Nate Williams about functional strength/balance testing.  It would seem that functional testing or some other testing might be necessary to baseline an athletes bio-mechanics.  What, if any baseline assessment, do you like to do with your athletes? 

Okay, we've talked a bit about newer athletes.  I don't presume bio-mechanic development is only for new athletes.  Can we talk a couple of different cases that you have been presented with and how you have customized or integrated bio-mechanic development into their training.

How do we know good form when we see it?  Or, how do we measure it?  What quantitative tools do you use?

For those listeners who are curious, what are you doing in your coaching career now? 

Are you working on any big projects (eg James Lawrence 50 IM dist in 50 days)?

I wanted to talk to you about the NYC Marathon before we wrap up.  How did how your race in 2015 go?

Nov 13, 2016

Welcome to Episode #47 of the Mile High Endurance podcast. Mile High Endurance is your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance and triathlon goals. I'm your host Rich Soares with co-host Khem Suthiwan.

  • [00:00] Intro and NYC Marathon report 
  • [25:38] Dr Nate Williams
  • [55:46] Wrap Up

Today's interview:

Khem, today's interview topic is about being proactive about functional testing and addressing strength imbalances or flexibility issues.  How do you incorporate this topic into your coaching with athletes?

About the guest:   Nate has been helping me with a two lower leg issues this year.  In the spring it was a tight right calf.  More recently, it has been a tightness in my left shin area.  We've been discussing the importance of functional testing and strength balance.  I learned quite a bit about this personally when I rehabbed a meniscus repair a few years ago.

The interview is on sight.  There's a couple of spots where there's background noise, but those are brief so stick with it.   We do a brief discussion in his office and then move into the gym to perform a cursory functional test on me.

 

Nov 5, 2016

Welcome to Episode #46 of the Mile High Endurance podcast.  Mile High Endurance is your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance and triathlon goals.   I'm your host Rich Soares with co-host Khem Suthiwan.  Today's episode is really going to be about the NYC Marathon and sharing the experience with you.  I am in New York City as we record this and Khem is holding down the fort in Denver.

Since our interview with MBE, I've been enjoying my 2 weeks in "taperville" as called it last week.  I did my 12 mile run as 5.7 and over distance pace and then the final 6 at my sub threshold pace with Tom Beal (the beer can trophy guy).    Sorry for the specificity of the 5.7, but Tom did not want to hear on the podcast that I ran 12 miles when I only ran 11.7. 

 

If you listened to the wrap up of last week's show you would have heard the summary of the marathon plan that I wrote and executed.  I want to make sure the folks know this was a plan that was unique for me and my goals and capacity to train for this marathon.  This plan was designed to take an athlete that has a decade of experience at long distance triathlon, marathon and ultra-marathon experience and transition them from short-course triathlon to marathon distance in less than 3 months.  For many athletes that ramp up might not be safe.  I would classify the plan I did as intermediate-advanced.  I will be making a Blog post with the basic tenets of the training plan and optional novice and intermediate, as well as an advanced plan versions.  The basic construct, including the combining of the L-S-D and Tempo runs in the Race Specific Preparation phase.  If you want to hear the description of the plan, please go check out the last 10 minutes or so of Episode #45.

Also in last week's show I mentioned some of our upcoming guests for "September" (yes, I said "September") but what I intended to say was November. Hopefully you all figured that out.  Still ahead in the month of November are interviews with:

Dr. Nate Williams

Performance Sport Chiropractic

Being proactive about strength imbalances and flexibility issues

Coach David Warden

Of David Warden Coaching and Tri Talk Podcast

Using the off-season to focus on technique and form

Dr. Bob Seebohar

Metabolic Efficiency Training

About the book Metabolic Efficiency Training and Testing

"Sherpa" John Lecroix

Human Potential Endurance

HPRS Race Series; growing sport of Ultra Running, and the necessary efforts to preserve the old school roots of the sport’s culture

Intro:

The guest interview on this week's show is a fellow NYC Marathoner, ultra-runner, yogi and good friend Bronwyn Morrissey.  Welcome onto the show Bronwyn.   Before we get into the discussion why don't you tell the listeners a little about your running background.

 

So Bronwyn and I met in our professional lives.  Bronwyn has been a business partner with Pulte Mortgage, and came out to watch and support the inaugural Pule Mortgage MBA Opens Doors 5K Fundraiser in 2014.  We got to talking about running and found that we had a similar passion.  Ironically 3 years later, both of us are given the opportunity to represent MBA Opens Doors Foundation at the NYC Marathon.  We are recording this week's episode from our hotel rooms in Manhattan.  The topic today is about the NYC Marathon in particular.  It is part "documentary", part "how to guide", and 2 parts "marathon training tips".

 

Before we get into the discussion on the NYC race in particular, why don't we take a minute or two to talk about the MBA Opens Doors Foundation, the work they do and the amount of money that we have helped raise for the Foundation.

  • Official mission from website
  • MBA Opens Doors Foundation covers the cost.  Every $1 donated goes to a family.
  • Number of families helped each year
  • Amount of money collected
  • # of athletes running for MBA Opens Doors

 

  • Discuss the experience of arriving in NYC and attending the Expo
  • About the number of runners and waves - http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/10/30/sports/new-york-marathon-in-six-charts.html
  • Advice or Lessons Learned about navigating the NYC Marathon logistics 
  • Top Training Tips - The main focus of today's discussion is for Bronwyn and I to share some of our marathon training tips.  I had originally had this ambitions idea of each of us coming up with our Top 10, but realized after preparing the outline that we should probably stick to 2 or 3 each.   With that, we'll take turns sharing out training tips or advice for marathon preparation.
    • Bronwyn - training tip #1  - Moderation and 10% progression
    • Rich - training tip #1 Hydration and hydration systems
    1. This is such an obvious item that I don't feel I have to explain the basic reasons for hydrating, but I will with you some of the things that I have experienced in my training and some of my suggestions. 
    2. I am a heavy sweater and have struggled with keeping up my fluid needs in hot races in particular.
    3. Start practicing early in your training.  For me, on a mild temperature day (say 60 degrees), I would not typically take any fluid for a run less than hour.   In hotter conditions, say 75 degrees or hotter I will likely take 6-12 ounces with me.  As you begin your marathon plan, you should plan to practice drinking to thirst and to need.  A lot of experts recommend drinking to thirst, but I'll tell you my thirst sometimes gets overridden by stomach jostling and/or lack of focus.  There are times when I simply did not get thirsty and still ended up dehydrated.  There are various protocols you can follow to determine your fluid loss including weighing before/after and noting fluid consumed.
    4. Practice taking in 3-4 ounces every 15 minutes or 6-8 every 30 minutes.  As your training runs start to approach and exceed 3 hours, heavy sweaters are more likely to notice effects of dehydration which include insert effects of dehydration.
    5. Make fluid available and convenient.  If you are training with a group like Team in Training, you often will have supported training runs with nutrition and water provided for you at aid stations.  If you are not fortunate enough to have a supported training session, you need to bring your fluid with you.  I have used a number of different hydration systems including waist belts with bottles (Fuel Belt and Amphipod), handhelds (Amphipod and Nathan), and hydration packs (Nathan).  I personally have found useful applications for all 3 types.  I personally prefer my hand held for shorter distances and racing on occasion.  I use my Nathan pack for anything over 10 miles.  My least favorite are the belt and bottle systems.  It's too much effort to fill multiple bottle and I have limited success keeping all of my bottles on my waist and end up having to stop and pick up a bottle if and when it is not properly secured in its holder/holster.  My Nathan pack can hold 70 ounces of fluid.  The pack itself is light weight, breathable mesh, lots of pockets for food, sunscreen and other supplies, including toilet paper and a cell phone depending.
    6. Make sure you clean it right away.  Nothing will ruin a hydration pack faster than leaving sports drink in your pack and leaving it in a warm garage for a week.  Even if you want to get off your feet after a long run, you will want to empty out remaining fluid and wash with warm water and dish soap.  Be sure to run the warm soapy water through the tube and mouthpiece.  It should drain out with the assistance of gravity if you hold the nozzle below the pack and bladder.  Be sure to rinse and drain out thoroughly and enable it to dry well.  Be sure when draining, to also open the mouth piece and allow the water to drain out the tube.  I then ball up half dozen or so paper towels and insert them into the drained bag so to keep the plastic walls of the bladder from touching and allow airflow in and out of the bladder.  I then hang it upside down so it can dry before my next long run.  So there you go. 
  • Bronwyn - Tip #2 - yoga and rest
  • Rich - Tip #2 Consistency
    1. In order to get the most out of your training plan, you really want to be consistent about your training.  Keep in mind, the human body is an organism that responds to stimulus of stress and recovery.  To adapt, your body will recognize the training patterns and adapt accordingly.  If you are on a build phase, your body will recognize the increasing volume, expect and respond.  If you don't supply your body with a consistent and progressing load, the body will not respond to training it does not receive.  In fact it will regress.  Think of a plant that responds well to light, water and plant food.  Lets' say you are trying to grow a prize winning corn plant for a contest in the fall.  Would you intentionally rob it of light, water or  fertilizer for periods of time.  Probably not - you'd give it a steady supply of the stimulus it needs to grow.
    2. Plan ahead.  Make sure your figure out your real life constraints and work with a coach to design a plan around your life so that you don’t have competing priorities that rob you of the planned training. 
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