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Mile High Endurance Podcast

Mile High Endurance is recorded in the Rocky Mountain front range area in Denver, Colorado. 55 miles to the north is the triathlon 'Mecca' of Boulder, home of some of the most prominent pros in triathlon and related sports. 56 miles to the south is the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. The Olympic Complex in Colorado Springs is the flagship training center for the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Olympic Training Center programs. The 110 mile stretch between Boulder and Colorado Springs is one of the fittest and athletic populated areas in the world. I share these statistics, not so much to brag but to give you the listener context for what the culture and vibe is here in the Mile High area. ​The objective of the Mile High Tri podcast is to connect you to the triathlon community and empower you to achieve your triathlon and fitness goals. Each month we will take subjects that you are interested in and connect your interests with news, expert interviews, and information about services and products in a way that inform your decisions to achieve your full potential in the sport.
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Now displaying: July, 2019
Jul 28, 2019

Welcome to Episode #188 of the Mile High Endurance podcast. You are listening to your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance goals. We are your hosts coach Rich Soares and 303 Chief Bill Plock. Thanks for joining us for another week of endurance.

Thanks to last week's guest coach Will Murray joining us to talk about how we can develop Post Traumatic Stress to events in our lives that affect our ability to function and perform.

Today's guest is preparing for an extraordinary feat of endurance. Terence Steinberg is getting ready to participate in a rowing race across the Atlantic starting this December. We are going to hear more about the United World Challenge and the Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge in just a bit.

Announcements:

  • Go to MileHighEndurancePodcast.com, click on the "subscribe" button, and you will get the newsletter with show notes and all the links and articles sent to you automatically every week.
  • If you love the show, please consider making a donation of any amount by clicking the PayPal donate button at the bottom of the Podcast page.
  • If you are a coach or have something to share with an audience of endurance enthusiasts, please reach out and tell us about the topic you want to share.

Sponsor - iKOR Labs:

Today's show is supported by iKOR Labs. iKOR is a clean, natural source of recovery enhancing CBD that protects your body from the stresses of training, improves recovery from intense efforts and helps you maintain a positive mental state. It is the most bio-available CBD product on the market, iKOR is a protective anti-oxidant and highly effective anti-inflammatory. It is used by world class professional athletes. Save 20% by using the code "endurance" at checkout and consider saving even more by doing auto recurring order. Go to www.ikorlabs.com for more details.

In Today's Show:

  • What's new in the 303
  • News
  • Don’t Fry Bacon Naked
  • Video of the Week
  • Feature interview
  • Upcoming Interviews

"What's New in the 303":

https://303cycling.com/mines-colorado-classic-trailblazing-women-panel-july-26th-dont-miss-this-one/  The Colorado Classic, a four-stage women’s pro road cycling race, and Colorado School of Mines, are joining forces to celebrate trailblazing women, athletes, and engineers as a part of the climb to this year’s Colorado Classic (August 22-25).

Ironman Boulder 70.3 coming up on August 4th

Dennis vanderhoven damien

 

Endurance News:

https://ragbrai.com/routemaps/2019-route-maps/

 

 

  • Shout out to all those doing races this weekend.  Special good luck to one of my co-workers and friends in Ohio racing Ohio Ironman 70.3.  Crush it Kelly Garland!

 

Sponsor - Riplaces:

Our interview is sponsored by Riplaces. Riplaces are an elastic lace system that integrates a bungee loop with a plastic core to connect the loop in each eyelet of your running shoe. The bungees come in 5 sizes to achieve custom tension for the perfect fit. The bungees and the cores come in a variety of colors and styles to help you personalize your set. Or, you can choose the MHE logo package. Pro triathlete proven and endorsed, use the code MHE25 to get that 25% discount. Go to www.riplaces.com for more information, or go to the MHE Sponsor Discounts page by going to www.milehighendurance.com, or directly to https://www.riplaces.com/collections/mile-high-endurance

Interview Introduction:

A little history: Sir Charles "Chay" Blyth CBE BEM (born 14 May 1940) is a Scottish yachtsman and rower. He was the first person to sail single-handed non-stop westwards around the world (1971), on a 59-foot boat called British Steel.

 

Blyth was born in Hawick, Roxburghshire. He joined the British Army Parachute Regiment when he was 18 and was promoted to Sergeant at the age of 21. In 1966, while in the army, Blyth, together with Captain John Ridgway, rowed across the North Atlantic in a 20 ft open dory called English Rose III. After successfully completing this in 92 days, Blyth was awarded the British Empire Medal (BEM).

 

Rowing the Atlantic first became mainstream when the first Atlantic Rowing Race was launched by Sir Chay Blyth, after reflecting on his own ocean row that propelled him to international fame. This was the Port St. Charles, Barbados Atlantic Rowing Race. Thirty double-handed teams lined up at the start line in a "one design" rowing boat just outside Los Gigantes marina on Sunday 12 October 1997. The race was won by Kiwi Challenge, rowed by Rob Hamill and Phil Stubbs after 41 days at sea. Second place went to the French crew of Atlantik Challenge, Joseph Le Guen and his partner, a double convicted murderer, Pascal Blond.

 

Fast forward to today. 

 

Terence Steinberg is preparing to compete in a 3,000 mile rowing race across the Atlantic.  As you will hear he is doing this for the UWC (United World Colleges), which is a global movement that makes education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. 

 

The movement began in 1962 when Atlantic College in Wales, UK admitted its first students. The Cold War raged and UWC set out to bring together young people from different nations to act as champions of peace through an education based on shared learning, collaboration, and understanding. UWC has since gained global recognition a catalyst for international understanding, and today teaches 3,000 college students each year in 17 locations on 4 continents. Students come from more than 155 countries, each selected for their demonstrated promise and potential.

The Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge: The World’s Toughest Row. The premier event in ocean rowing – A challenge that will take you more than 3000 Miles west from San Sebastian in La Gomera, Canary Islands (28oN 18oW) to Nelson’s Dockyard English Harbour, Antigua & Barbuda (17oN 61oW). The annual race begins in early December, with up to 30 teams participating from around the world. The race structure brings together an environment where teams from across the globe gather in the race village San Sebastian in La Gomera, Canary Islands.

 

 

Sponsor - Halo Neuroscience:

Our post interview discussion is sponsored by Halo Neuroscience. The Halo Sport from Halo Neuroscience will help you learn the technique and form to get faster. 20 minutes of neural priming with the Halo Headset gives you an hour of neural plasticity to work and lock in the muscle movement that leads to strength, power and endurance. Use the code "MHE" at checkout to save an additional $20.

 

Video of the Week:

Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge 2017 - Race Promo

 

 

 

 

 

Don't Fry Bacon Naked:

Last week we discussed how to not get burned by getting your altitude acclimatization right.  The example we were discussing was Bill had been at sea level for a week, came back to Colorado to do the Triple Bypass and felt a lack of fitness. How much of that was due to a loss of altitude acclimatization?

How quickly to make an altitude acclimatization? 

http://www.bodyresults.com/e2deacc.asp

According to Lawrence Armstrong, PhD, in his book, Performing in Extreme Environments (1), the rate of disappearance of the body’s adaptations to high altitude varies widely from person to person; just as it’s difficult to tell who exactly will experience signs of altitude illness, it’s hard to know how long your acclimatized state will last once you descend from high altitude. If you spend less than a day or two at altitude (say, on a moderate climb of a peak like Baker or Rainier, where most people return to sea level within 24 hours of reaching the summit), your body will not have had enough time to permanently adapt to the altitude. The composition of the blood changes after about 2 weeks of altitude exposure by producing more red blood cells and hemoglobin (the iron-protein compound that transports oxygen) (3) but most people climbing peaks in the Pacific Northwest are only exposed to elevation for about 3-4 days at a time.

 

Training acclimatization time needs to be longer as the altitude becomes higher. Training for 14 days at or above 6,500 feet (as at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs) and 28 days at or above 8,000 feet are currently the best recommendations for athletes wishing to compete at similar elevations, while complete adaptation to the extreme altitude of 13,000 feet is possible after a continuous stay for 14 months (3). Obviously, climbers have a tiny fraction of this time open to them.

 

One study cited by Armstrong indicates that the red blood cell volume of high-altitude natives (people who spend most of their lives above 7000 ft) decreases as quickly as ten days after spending time at sea level. Someone spending several hours to perhaps a day or two at altitude simply won’t have enough time for any long-lasting physiological changes. Those who choose to trek in Nepal, however, or participate in an expedition-type climb of a peak over 15,000 ft will have to spend a substantial amount of time adapting to the altitude in order to prevent altitude sickness. This is why climbers who gradually ascend their first peak in Alaska, Bolivia, Chile, or the Himalayas in order to get properly acclimatized can then speed up subsequent peaks, because the body’s ability to perform physical work at high altitude can persist for a few weeks (2). Through personal discussion with our African guide, cook, and porters on Mt. Kilimanjaro, and in talking with local Northwest guides and rangers who spend a lot of time on the mountains, we learned that they typically spend a week in the mountains above 10,000 ft and a week back home; their acclimatization and improved cardiovascular function may persist for several months after returning from altitude, and allows them to make subsequent trips quite easily without needing extra time to adapt.

https://www2.palomar.edu/anthro/adapt/adapt_3.htm

How quickly to lose altitude advantage?

How does living at altitude affect how quickly you lose or gain altitude adaptations?

https://www.princeton.edu/~oa/safety/altitude.html

What is High Altitude?

 

Altitude is defined on the following scale High (8,000 - 12,000 feet [2,438 - 3,658 meters]), Very High (12,000 - 18,000 feet [3,658 - 5,487 meters]), and Extremely High (18,000+ feet [5,500+ meters]). Since few people have been to such altitudes, it is hard to know who may be affected. There are no specific factors such as age, sex, or physical condition that correlate with susceptibility to altitude sickness. Some people get it and some people don't, and some people are more susceptible than others. Most people can go up to 8,000 feet (2,438 meters) with minimal effect. If you haven't been to high altitude before, it's important to be cautious. If you have been at that altitude before with no problem, you can probably return to that altitude without problems as long as you are properly acclimatized.

 

What Causes Altitude Illnesses?

 

The concentration of oxygen at sea level is about 21% and the barometric pressure averages 760 mmHg. As altitude increases, the concentration remains the same but the number of oxygen molecules per breath is reduced. At 12,000 feet (3,658 meters) the barometric pressure is only 483 mmHg, so there are roughly 40% fewer oxygen molecules per breath. In order to properly oxygenate the body, your breathing rate (even while at rest) has to increase. This extra ventilation increases the oxygen content in the blood, but not to sea level concentrations. Since the amount of oxygen required for activity is the same, the body must adjust to having less oxygen. In addition, for reasons not entirely understood, high altitude and lower air pressure causes fluid to leak from the capillaries which can cause fluid build-up in both the lungs and the brain. Continuing to higher altitudes without proper acclimatization can lead to potentially serious, even life-threatening illnesses.

Acclimatization

 

What is altitude illness?

The major cause of altitude illnesses is going too high too fast. Given time, your body can adapt to the decrease in oxygen molecules at a specific altitude. This process is known as acclimatization and generally takes 1-3 days at that altitude. For example, if you hike to 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), and spend several days at that altitude, your body acclimatizes to 10,000 feet (3,048 meters). If you climb to 12,000 feet (3,658 meters), your body has to acclimatize once again. A number of changes take place in the body to allow it to operate with decreased oxygen.

The depth of respiration increases.

Pressure in pulmonary arteries is increased, "forcing" blood into portions of the lung which are normally not used during sea level breathing.

The body produces more red blood cells to carry oxygen,

The body produces more of a particular enzyme that facilitates

the release of oxygen from hemoglobin to the body tissues.

 

Are there genetic dispositions to altitude?

There is considerable variability between individuals and between populations in their ability to adjust to the environmental stresses of high mountain regions.  Usually, the populations that are most successful are those whose ancestors have lived at high altitudes for thousands of years.  This is the case with some of the indigenous peoples living in the Andes Mountains of Peru and Bolivia as well as the Tibetans and Nepalese in the Himalaya Mountains.  The ancestors of many people in each of these populations have lived above 13,000 feet (ca. 4000 meters) for at least 2,700 years.

More from The Sports Gene by David Epstein in Chapter 14.

 

Upcoming Interviews:

  • Tom Walker from InnerFight Coaching on run strength training programs to prevent injury and promote performance.
  • Carole Sharpless, former pro, triathlon and swimming coach; listen to our original interview on episode #36 (8/28/16)

 

Closing:

Please support our affiliate brands that support the show and help you get faster! See the https://milehighendurancepodcast.com/sponsors page.

Be sure to follow us on social media to get the show announcement each weekend, plus additional links to show content. We forward information related to our guests and provide teasers for upcoming interviews.

  • Facebook @milehighendurancepodcast
  • Twitter @milehighpodcast
  • Instagram @tripodcasterrich
  • YouTube Channel @Mile High Endurance Podcast

We hope you enjoyed today's show. Please rate us on iTunes or your podcast player. Be sure you are subscribed in iTunes so you get the show automatically downloaded on Saturday evening and recommend Mile High Endurance to a friend.

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Jul 20, 2019

Welcome to Episode #187 of the Mile High Endurance podcast. You are listening to your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance goals. We are your hosts coach Rich Soares and 303 Chief Bill Plock. Thanks for joining us for another week of endurance.

Thanks to last week's guests Brent and Kyle Pease, the first push-assist brother duo to complete the IRONMAN World Championship who joined us to tell their story through the book, Beyond the Finish, an inspiring memoir about brotherhood and relentless determination. The book and the interview really inspired me.  Check out KylePeaseFoundation.org  The Kyle Pease Foundation to learn how you can support their cause.  Bill, how much harder do you think it would be to do an Ironman pulling and pushing someone?

In today's show we have coach Will Murray joining us to talk about how we can develop Post Traumatic Stress to events in our lives that affect our ability to function and perform. It's an interesting area and one that many listeners may be able to identify with.

Announcements:

  • Go to MileHighEndurancePodcast.com, click on the "subscribe" button, and you will get the newsletter with show notes and all the links and articles sent to you automatically every week.
  • If you love the show, please consider making a donation of any amount by clicking the PayPal donate button at the bottom of the Podcast page.
  • If you are a coach or have something to share with an audience of endurance enthusiasts, please reach out and tell us about the topic you want to share.

Sponsor - iKOR Labs:

Today's show is supported by iKOR Labs. iKOR is a clean, natural source of recovery enhancing CBD that protects your body from the stresses of training, improves recovery from intense efforts and helps you maintain a positive mental state. It is the most bio-available CBD product on the market, iKOR is a protective anti-oxidant and highly effective anti-inflammatory. It is used by world class professional athletes. Save 20% by using the code "endurance" at checkout and consider saving even more by doing auto recurring order. Go to www.ikorlabs.com for more details.

In Today's Show:

  • Feature interview
  • Video of the Week
  • Don’t Fry Bacon Naked
  • What's new in the 303
  • News
  • Upcoming Interviews

Sponsor - Riplaces:

Our interview is sponsored by Riplaces. Riplaces are an elastic lace system that integrates a bungee loop with a plastic core to connect the loop in each eyelet of your running shoe. The bungees come in 5 sizes to achieve custom tension for the perfect fit. The bungees and the cores come in a variety of colors and styles to help you personalize your set. Or, you can choose the MHE logo package. Pro triathlete proven and endorsed, use the code MHE25 to get that 25% discount. Go to www.riplaces.com for more information, or go to the MHE Sponsor Discounts page by going to www.milehighendurance.com, or directly to https://www.riplaces.com/collections/mile-high-endurance

Interview Introduction:

Will Murray is a trained mental skills coach and has authored numerous articles and books.  I recommend that you go to the MHE endurance website and check the links to Will's recent article and book on the Main page and there are several links to his work on the Resources page. 

 

Sponsor - Halo Neuroscience:

Our post interview discussion is sponsored by Halo Neuroscience. The Halo Sport from Halo Neuroscience will help you learn the technique and form to get faster. 20 minutes of neural priming with the Halo Headset gives you an hour of neural plasticity to work and lock in the muscle movement that leads to strength, power and endurance. Use the code "MHE" at checkout to save an additional $20.

 

Video of the Week:

Getting frank about IM Frankfurt

 

 

Dialing in heat management

Dialing in hydration and salt intake

How to get to Kona

Ironman Cairns and Frankfurt

No point getting to Kona fried

700 meters with a 12 minute lead

Showing up to regional champs to qualify, but if had an early season lower competition.

Under the point system, she would have qualified.

Blood tests in balance.

 

Don't Fry Bacon Naked:

Heat management and acclimatization occurs with regular exposure to heat while performing aerobic exercise for 10 days.  https://www.gssiweb.org/sports-science-exchange/article/sse-153-heat-acclimatization-to-improve-athletic-performance-in-warm-hot-environments

Of course there's the fluid and sodium con course there's the fluid and sodium consumption required to keep your body hydrated.  The best advice is to test and don't guess.

Bonus:  Follow up to last week's discussion about OWS sighting and straight line swimming. If you remember we were talking about how to stay relaxed while OWS.  I mentioned I like to count my strokes.  It takes my mind off the environment and how I'm feeling and it places my attention somewhere else (keeping track of my counting).  This serves a secondary purpose as well.  If you know your SPL (Strokes Per Length) of a 25 meter pool, for example.  Let's say for the sake of example that it takes you 20 strokes per length.  You know that for every 20 strokes your are going approximately 25 meters, then you can extend that math linearly.  40 strokes equals 50 meters, 80 equals 100, etc.  The key is to find your SPL for a 25M or convert your SPL for 25Y to 25M.  If you know the distance between buoys in a race, let's say the buoys are every 200 meters, you know it should take approximately 160 strokes or 80 right hand entries. 

We also talked about reaching as far as you can to the shore or the buoy.  The goal is to elongate your body and streamline so that you have balance in the water and glide a bit.  As long as you are already thinking about getting a good reach, be intentionally about your hand entry. When you sight the buoy or landmark, take the mental snapshot and place your next hand entry just to the side of the landmark.  If it's your right hand, try to intentionally place it just to the right of the mark.  Be as precise as you can and do it for the left hand.  Now imagine a line running from the landmark straight down below the water surface.  Then imagine that line painted directly below you and extending behind you (as it would be in a pool).  With your extended hand entering just adjacent to the landmark, now paint a line with than hand adjacent tp the line that runs from the landmark, directly below the surface and then under and behind you. 

Part of swimming straight is also making sure you have a consistent stroke length and on both sides. Keep track of where each hand completes the stroke. I like to touch my thigh with my thumb as my hand completes the stoke.  Note if your hands are touching the same part of your thigh on both sides.  Another tip that can assist with swimming straight is using a tempo trainer in the pool to learn a balanced cadence so the timing of each hand entry is symmetric.  If the timing of stroke on both sides are consistent and the stroke length are the same, you will set yourself up for success.

Next week:  How quickly to make an altitude acclimatization?  How quickly to lose altitude advantage?

 

"What's New in the 303":

https://303triathlon.com/boulder-peak-triathlon-delivers-meehan-standifer-champs/  I have two confessions to make about this race.  Confession #1 is that I raced way above my fitness level this year.  I was two minutes faster than last year, but I was as sore as I've ever been from a race or hard workout.  I knew I was in trouble on Sunday night, but by Monday morning I could barely get out of bed. It's not that I didn't know my training was insufficient, it's that I underestimated how sore I would be after.  This leads to Confession #2.  I spoke to you on Sunday after the race. I had just been looking at my TrainingPeaks file and saw a 25. something number.  I answer your call and somewhere in our call I told you that my bike seemed to be really fast.  I said I think my average speed was 25. something. Even when I was saying it, I knew how absurd that average speed would be for that course.  I've never hit an average or 25 for an Olympic let alone a Sprint. I think I was more wrecked on Sunday than I realized and had complete race brain.

https://www.coloradoclassic.com/  We have the Colorado Classic coming August 22 to 25.

https://303cycling.com/governor-jared-polis-proclaims-july-17-as-colorado-classic-equity-in-cycling-day/ “With this proclamation making July 17 Colorado Classic Equity in Cycling Day, I want to inspire women athletes and highlight equity in pro cycling because equality matters, in athletics, the workplace, and in all walks of life.”

https://303cycling.com/triple-bypass-its-about-the-journey/ The Triple Bypass, is really a journey, and it’s about the journey, not the finish as much. It’s about all the people you meet riding, the history that is passed by and the many miles high in altitude testing our fortitude and sense of wanting to accomplish something. It doesn’t matter how fast, slow or somewhere in between— as long as you finish and have fun!

Endurance News:

Tour de France impressions this week:  I watched Stage 11 from Albi to Toulouse.  I was impressed by the how well they keep content overlays to carry 4-5 hours of coverage.  Some of my favorite features are the inside the peloton cameras and the new Lexus sponsored 3D holograph model that they use to describe rider positions in various conditions.  The interviews with race directors, riders, to get their public comments. Cyclists are so cordial, polite, and generally try to be as non-controversial as possible.  Case in point, the race director from TEAM JUMBO - VISMA was interviewed about the Stage 10 win by WOUT VAN AERT.  When asked about the way Education First team played the cross winds in Stage 10, he very politely said that he could not make any judgement about any team, but that his team had been vigilant at the time they hit the crosswinds and made the right moves at the right time.

I also love learning the history of the race.  One of my favorites this were was the story of Henri Cornet winning the 1904 tour where there where he learned that he won in November after the Tour.  What happened is the first 4 riders were eventually disqualified. They had jumped a train and rode to the finish.  Riders on the train who saw the riders later read about them winning by hours ahead of the peloton and then reported them to the authorities. 

Since I don't have time watch 4 hours of the tour every day, I like to follow it on The Move podcast. You just get this completely unfiltered assessment and it's boiled down to an hour. Lance Armstrong presents a singular perspective on the world’s most iconic cycling races, including the Tour de France and the Classics, as well as the broader endurance sports scene. Not your typical cycling or sports podcast, THEMOVE brings listeners deep inside the racing action, imparting insights from someone who knows the suffering and splendor like no one else. In addition to  course previews and timely race analysis from Armstrong’s distinct point of view, the audience also gets to hear from featured guests, who regularly swing by the THEMOVE studio to join the always-lively conversation. Guests have included former teammates like George Hincapie during the Tour de France, and Mark Allen and Dave Scott in advance of the IRONMAN World Championship.

These two worlds came together on one particular story. On The Move podcast, Lance Armstrong was talking about how some of the best race directors back in the US Postal and 7-11 teams would monitor the channels of the other riders to here their tactics and observations and plans about the race course.  Bob Roll told the same story, but with a twist. He described how Lance's team knew that other team's monitored each other's channels - not just during the race, but even in the evening. Lance's team staged a misinformation campaign to make the eavesdropping teams believe that Lance had food poisoning or was ill.  The eavesdropping teams discounted Lance in their race plans and Lance and team took advantage of the lack of vigilance and rode right past them on a key climb.

Upcoming Interviews:

  • Tom Walker from InnerFight Coaching on run strength training programs to prevent injury and promote performance.
  • Terence Steinberg who going to tell us about the United World Challenge and his quest to row across the Atlantic ocean this coming Winter.
  • Carole Sharpless, former pro, triathlon and swimming coach; listen to our original interview on episode #36 (8/28/16)

Closing:

Please support our affiliate brands that support the show and help you get faster! See the https://milehighendurancepodcast.com/sponsors page.

Be sure to follow us on social media to get the show announcement each weekend, plus additional links to show content. We forward information related to our guests and provide teasers for upcoming interviews.

  • Facebook @milehighendurancepodcast
  • Twitter @milehighpodcast
  • Instagram @tripodcasterrich
  • YouTube Channel @Mile High Endurance Podcast

We hope you enjoyed today's show. Please rate us on iTunes or your podcast player. Be sure you are subscribed in iTunes so you get the show automatically downloaded on Saturday evening and recommend Mile High Endurance to a friend.

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Jul 14, 2019

Welcome to Episode #186 of the Mile High Endurance podcast. You are listening to your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance goals. We are your hosts coach Rich Soares and 303 Chief Bill Plock. Thanks for joining us for another week of endurance.

Thanks to last week's guest Nige Tassell on the book Three Weeks Eight Seconds.  It's a great book to read while watching the Tour de France. The story of the 1989 Tour as told in the book is told with such insight and detail that it really helps the reader get the game within the game, so-to-speak. Grab a copy of the book if you love cycling and the Tour, or if you just want to read a great story told by a great writer with a passion for a topic.

Prepare to be inspired! Prepare to be moved in today's show. If you've been following the show, you certainly got a chance to hear a little from the Newton Running athlete panel over Ironman Boulder weekend. 

Brent and Kyle Pease, the first push-assist brother duo to complete the grueling IRONMAN World Championship and founders of The Kyle Pease Foundation, join us to tell their story through the book, Beyond the Finish, an inspiring memoir about brotherhood and relentless determination. As you will hear shortly, Kyle is the brains and Brent the brawn in the brotherly bonded duo that has inspired people around the globe and helped all of us develop a better perspective on what cerebral palsy is, its variations, and that the people afflicted are people with personalities, ambitions, have dreams, want to be inspired and to inspire others, and yes, are sometimes athletes….even Ironmen.

Thanks to last week's discussion guest Nige Tassel who tells the story of the most famous bike race I the world and this epic battle in the book Three Weeks Eight Seconds.

Announcements:

  • Go to MileHighEndurancePodcast.com, click on the "subscribe" button, and you will get the newsletter with show notes and all the links and articles sent to you automatically every week.
  • If you love the show, please consider making a donation of any amount by clicking the PayPal donate button at the bottom of the Podcast page.
  • If you are a coach or have something to share with an audience of endurance enthusiasts, please reach out and tell us about the topic you want to share.

Sponsor - iKOR Labs:

Today's show is supported by iKOR Labs. iKOR is a clean, natural source of recovery enhancing CBD that protects your body from the stresses of training, improves recovery from intense efforts and helps you maintain a positive mental state. It is the most bio-available CBD product on the market, iKOR is a protective anti-oxidant and highly effective anti-inflammatory. It is used by world class professional athletes. Save 20% by using the code "endurance" at checkout and consider saving even more by doing auto recurring order. Go to www.ikorlabs.com for more details.

In Today's Show:

  • Feature interview
  • Tour highlight
  • Video of the Week
  • Don’t Fry Bacon Naked
  • What's new in the 303
  • News
  • Upcoming Interviews

Sponsor - Riplaces:

Our interview is sponsored by Riplaces. Riplaces are an elastic lace system that integrates a bungee loop with a plastic core to connect the loop in each eyelet of your running shoe. The bungees come in 5 sizes to achieve custom tension for the perfect fit. The bungees and the cores come in a variety of colors and styles to help you personalize your set. Or, you can choose the MHE logo package. Pro triathlete proven and endorsed, use the code MHE25 to get that 25% discount. Go to www.riplaces.com for more information, or go to the MHE Sponsor Discounts page by going to www.milehighendurance.com, or directly to https://www.riplaces.com/collections/mile-high-endurance

Interview Introduction:

I first became aware of the Pease Brothers at Ironman Boulder in 2017 and again in Kona in 2018.  It wasn't until the Newton athlete panel at this year's Ironman Boulder that I really got a chance to hear some of their story.  Jerry Lee purchased a copy of the Pease Brother's book, "Beyond the Finish" for all of the fans at the event.  After hearing their story, I was eager to read about it.  We're excited to interview them about the book, about their racing, about their bond, and about the inspiration that spills out all around them.  Let's get into the interview.

 

Video of the Week:

Brothers conquer Ironman triathlons together despite one's cerebral palsy

 

Sponsor - Halo Neuroscience:

Our post interview discussion is sponsored by Halo Neuroscience. The Halo Sport from Halo Neuroscience will help you learn the technique and form to get faster. 20 minutes of neural priming with the Halo Headset gives you an hour of neural plasticity to work and lock in the muscle movement that leads to strength, power and endurance. Use the code "MHE" at checkout to save an additional $20.

Don't Fry Bacon Naked:

Last week we introduced this segment with a discussion about really worthwhile test to get done, which is glycogen muscle ultrasound.  I've had it done and had athletes get it done.  It has helped reveal low glycogen levels, which can show symptoms if are severe enough.  It can also be high enough to not show many symptoms, but low enough that it could be revealed to you in a long race of two hours or more. The point being that if your glycogen stores are low, you could bonk much earlier than you might expect.

This week's lesson is about open water swimming and safety. This past weekend I was at one of our local spots for open water swimming.  We had a little scare with a swimmer last weekend.  A family was OWS for the first time and one person had a bit of a panic attach and another was overdue at the shore and there was a concern for his safety and an informal search that ensued.  Fortunately the overdue family member turned up and all was well. 

OWS is an experience that can cause anxiety, particularly for less experienced swimmers.  There are a number of factors that cause feelings of panic. Some are genuine fear of drowning, but its typically caused by a number of factors that are physiological as well. 

Episodes 27 and 85 with coach Will Murray

"What's New in the 303":

 

 

 

Endurance News:

  • Skip this week

 

Upcoming Interviews:

  • Next week we will have coach Will Murray on phobias and post traumatic stress.
  • Carole Sharpless, former pro, triathlon and swimming coach; listen to our original interview on episode #36 (8/28/16)

 

Closing:

Please support our affiliate brands that support the show and help you get faster! See the https://milehighendurancepodcast.com/sponsors page.

Be sure to follow us on social media to get the show announcement each weekend, plus additional links to show content. We forward information related to our guests and provide teasers for upcoming interviews.

  • Facebook @milehighendurancepodcast
  • Twitter @milehighpodcast
  • Instagram @tripodcasterrich
  • YouTube Channel @Mile High Endurance Podcast

We hope you enjoyed today's show. Please rate us on iTunes or your podcast player. Be sure you are subscribed in iTunes so you get the show automatically downloaded on Saturday evening and recommend Mile High Endurance to a friend.

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Jul 7, 2019

Welcome to Episode #185 of the Mile High Endurance podcast. You are listening to your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance goals. We are your hosts coach Rich Soares and 303 Chief Bill Plock. Thanks for joining us for another week of endurance interviews and discussion.

This weekend is the start of the 2019 Tour de France.  The tour starts in Bruxelles, Belgium and will cover 3,460 km over 21 stages ending on the Champs Elysees in Paris on July 28.  Some years there are some clear favorites. Some years there are classic battles.  Since the Tour de France began in 1903, there have always been efforts and drama.

The 1903 Tour de France was the first cycling race set up and sponsored by the newspaper L'Auto, ancestor of the current daily, L'Équipe. It ran from July 1 to 19 in six stages over 2,428 km (1,509 mi), and was won by Maurice Garin.

The 1989 Tour de France was the 76th edition of the Tour de France, one of cycling's Grand Tours and generally considered the most famous bike race in the world. The race consisted of 21 stages and a prologue, over 3,285 km (2,041 mi). It started on  July 1 1989 in Luxembourg before taking an anti-clockwise route through France to finish in Paris on 23 July. What made the race so incredible was the GC battle between Greg LeMond of the AD Renting–W-Cup–Bottecchia team, who had spent the previous two seasons recovering from a near-fatal hunting accident. His rival, two-time Tour winner Laurent Fignon (Super U–Raleigh–Fiat).

In honor of this weekend begin the start of the Tour, we have author Nige Tassel who tells the story of the most famous bike race I the world and this epic battle in the book Three Weeks Eight Seconds.

Thanks to last week's discussion guest Darryl Griffiths of Shotz Nutrition to talk about sweat testing, hydration and fueling.  I'm really excited about this topic.

Announcements:

  • Go to MileHighEndurancePodcast.com, click on the "subscribe" button, and you will get the newsletter with show notes and all the links and articles sent to you automatically every week.
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  • If you are a coach or have something to share with an audience of endurance enthusiasts, please reach out and tell us about the topic you want to share.

Sponsor - iKOR Labs:

Today's show is supported by iKOR Labs. iKOR is a clean, natural source of recovery enhancing CBD that protects your body from the stresses of training, improves recovery from intense efforts and helps you maintain a positive mental state. It is the most bio-available CBD product on the market, iKOR is a protective anti-oxidant and highly effective anti-inflammatory. It is used by world class professional athletes. Save 20% by using the code "endurance" at checkout and consider saving even more by doing auto recurring order. Go to www.ikorlabs.com for more details.

In Today's Show:

  • Feature interview
  • Video of the Week
  • Tip of the Week
  • What's new in the 303
  • News
  • Upcoming Interviews

Sponsor - Riplaces:

Our interview is sponsored by Riplaces. Riplaces are an elastic lace system that integrates a bungee loop with a plastic core to connect the loop in each eyelet of your running shoe. The bungees come in 5 sizes to achieve custom tension for the perfect fit. The bungees and the cores come in a variety of colors and styles to help you personalize your set. Or, you can choose the MHE logo package. Pro triathlete proven and endorsed, use the code MHE25 to get that 25% discount. Go to www.riplaces.com for more information, or go to the MHE Sponsor Discounts page by going to www.milehighendurance.com, or directly to https://www.riplaces.com/collections/mile-high-endurance

Interview Introduction:

Author Nige Tassell on the book Three Weeks Eight Seconds - Greg LeMond and Laurent Fignon and the epic Tour de France of 1989

 

 

Sponsor - Halo Neuroscience:

Our post interview discussion is sponsored by Halo Neuroscience. The Halo Sport from Halo Neuroscience will help you learn the technique and form to get faster. 20 minutes of neural priming with the Halo Headset gives you an hour of neural plasticity to work and lock in the muscle movement that leads to strength, power and endurance. Use the code "MHE" at checkout to save an additional $20.

About the interview:

  • It's interesting that we are getting the book in the US two years after it was published in Germany.  It was published in Spanish before English. 
  • 7 Eleven team at Tour de Trump using the aero bars and Ron Keifel

Don't Fry Bacon Naked:

Why the new segment and how the title was derived.

  • The naming of
    • Early career management development
    • Collection of personal experiences
    • Topics inspired by real life experiences and supported by the context of our expert guests
  • Quest for knowledge and what coaching is for me
    • Podcast as a way to learn
    • How and why I became a coach

Last week we had Darryl Griffiths to talk about sweat testing.  He showcased how his company's protocol works for determining an athlete's sweat rate and sodium concentration to help athletes know factually how much sweat and sodium they are losing in certain environmental conditions.  I love this interview because it really helps crack the performance code for any athlete.  We use the term "no guessing" a lot on this show and it really is part of a philosophy that I embrace with respect to training. 

I encourage my athletes to know the facts with respect to their body's sweat rate, sodium concentration, metabolic rates, and glycogen stores.  We can do some of this ourselves, as in the DIY version of a sweat rate test, however some tests need to be done in a lab.  While I know exactly how much training an athlete is performing and have performance data to indicate to see if the training objectives are being met, I don't know what's really going on inside the athlete's body without some additional information.

The past week I had my weekly meeting with Matt to review testing results from CU Sports Medicine and Performance.  Matt is training for his first 70.3 and has been building is training volume steadily with periodic field testing and recovery weeks.  He has one "rest day" each week.  Again, I know how much training volume he is performing, but we didn't yet know his fuel metabolism (fuel economy) at different intensities or his glycogen stores (how well he's refilling the gas tank after each training day).

Matt got his test results back and indicated a below average to very low "Fuel Rating" for various leg muscles.  This tells Matt that his fuel storage is not keeping up with the demands of training.  Keep in mind that we follow the 80/20 rule, generally speaking so we try to avoid "grey zone" training.  Add to the this test result, that Matt has been challenged to get his HR in target zones during some run sets recently.  This sets off some alarms for me as a coach.  Back when we did the interview with Dr. Inigo San Milan, he explained that

We have just started tracking his macronutrients, so it will be interesting to see where this takes us.  We are also going to start tracking sleep data.  Not just reported hours of sleep, but actually collecting data. I learned from my time as a failing math major in college, if it doesn’t add up, you don’t have all the numbers. We may need some help unlocking some knowledge with respect to nutrition and sleep.  If needed, we'll reach out for expert advice.  We have a pretty solid set of experts to put him in touch with.

Video of the Week:

Greatest Tour de France Finish, 1989!

 

 

 

"What's New in the 303":

 

 

 

Endurance News:

 

Upcoming Interviews:

  • Brent and Kyle Pease, the first push-assist brother duo to complete the grueling IRONMAN World Championship and founders of The Kyle Pease Foundation, announce the upcoming release of Beyond the Finish, an inspiring memoir about brotherhood and relentless determination.
  • Carole Sharpless, former pro, triathlon and swimming coach; listen to our original interview on episode #36 (8/28/16)
  • Will Murray on phobias and post traumatic stress.

 

Closing:

Please support our affiliate brands that support the show and help you get faster! See the https://milehighendurancepodcast.com/sponsors page.

Be sure to follow us on social media to get the show announcement each weekend, plus additional links to show content. We forward information related to our guests and provide teasers for upcoming interviews.

  • Facebook @milehighendurancepodcast
  • Twitter @milehighpodcast
  • Instagram @tripodcasterrich
  • YouTube Channel @Mile High Endurance Podcast

We hope you enjoyed today's show. Please rate us on iTunes or your podcast player. Be sure you are subscribed in iTunes so you get the show automatically downloaded on Saturday evening and recommend Mile High Endurance to a friend.

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

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