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Mile High Endurance Podcast

Mile High Endurance Podcast is recorded in the Rocky Mountain front range area in Denver, Colorado. 55 miles to the north is the triathlon 'Mecca' of Boulder, home of some of the most prominent pros in triathlon and related sports. 56 miles to the south is the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. The Olympic Complex in Colorado Springs is the flagship training center for the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Olympic Training Center programs. The 110 mile stretch between Boulder and Colorado Springs is one of the fittest and athletic populated areas in the world. I share these statistics, not so much to brag but to give you the listener context for what the culture and vibe is here in the Mile High area. ​The objective of the Mile High Endurance Podcast is to connect you to the triathlon community and empower you to achieve your triathlon and fitness goals. Each month we will take subjects that you are interested in and connect your interests with news, expert interviews, and information about services and products in a way that inform your decisions to achieve your full potential in the sport.
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Now displaying: September, 2021
Sep 25, 2021

This week we are breaking down St. George and have local athlete Diana Hassel to share her race report.  Diana is one of the most successful amateur triathletes in the world. She is the 2017 Hawaii Ironman Champion W50-54. 

Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD

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In Today's Show

  • Feature interview with Diane Hassel
  • Endurance News
    • IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in St George
    • 2021 IRONMAN World Championship moves to UT in May 2022
    • 2021 IRONMAN Chattanooga September 26 TriRating Rankings
  • What's new in the 303
    • DU Triathlon Team Wins at Oktoberfest
  • Video of the Week
    • Lucy Charles "Pure Joy" Finish at IRONMAN 70.3 World Champs in St George

 

Interview Sponsor: UCAN

Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!

 

You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at

ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

Interview with Diana Hassel

Diana M Hassel, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, Dipl. ACVECC

Professor & Equine Section Head

Equine Emergency Surgery & Critical Care

Diana is one of the most successful amateur triathletes in the world. She is the 2017 Hawaii Ironman Champion W50-54.  Over the years she has become an advocate for training smart and she really enjoys helping triathletes who seek her advice. It was only normal for her to join our coaching staff in 2015.

Diana discovered her passion for triathlon later in life, having competed in her first triathlon at age 29. As a child she ran cross country and track and has been an avid master's swimmer and competitor since 1986. Diana is also a cat 2 cyclist and has held age group titles in the Colorado State Time Trial Championships, Road Race Championships and Best All Around Rider. She began competitive cycling during her PhD training at UC Davis that readily translated into successful triathlon performances. She has extensive experience with both heart rate and power training for the bike.

Her knowledge of training methods and her vast experience in racing combined with her unparalleled results will be a great asset to SmartTriathlonTraining. Diana is one of the most decorated athletes with 10 Hawaii Ironman age group podium awards including one World Championship. Diana will be helping all of our athletes on our internal “ask the coach” page. Her career as a surgeon and criticalist in veterinary medicine with a PhD in Comparative Pathology and lifelong fascination with exercise physiology and nutrition adds to her coaching expertise. Diana lives in Ft Collins Colorado with her husband, Dean, who is also a triathlete, and her daughter Mikayla, an avid horseperson.

 

Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance.

It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy’s mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!

 

Endurance News:

St. George, Iconic Race and a Look Into the Future; Coloradans do Well!

Posted on September 21, 2021

By Bill Plock

The authentic joy Lucy Charles Barclay beamed to the world the second she broke the tape is something I’ll never forget. It gave me goosebumps and seemed deep seated, especially as she came to hug her husband with tears running down her face. I have never seen or felt such happiness.

Barclay, like all the athletes battled very unusual weather with a down pour of rain and hail and lightening that threatened the race. With a Barclay comfortably in the lead all day, she knew she was having “a day” and said at the press conference recalling her thoughts, “they better not cancel this race!”

Gustav Iden of Norway didn’t quite lead the entire way but went to the front of the pack on the bike part way through and never looked back. Fellow countryman and gold medalist Kristian Blummenfelt was in that lead group when he suffered a serious mechanical failure with his wheel and fell out of contention. Boulder’s Sam Long, with a solid swim battled hard to ride into second place never did catch Iden. Iden won by 5 minutes retaining his World Champion status he gained after winning in Nice in 2019.

The second place finishes for Long and another Boulder resident, Jeanni Metzler may be a glimpse into the future of the sport.  Just two years ago Long finish 26 minutes back and has kept a poster of Nice in his “pain cave” as motivation ever since. Metzler has been climbing the ranks and finished 3rd in Boulder a few weeks ago behind Taylor Knibb and Emma Palant Brown, but in St. George she beat both of them.

Metzler passed Knibb just a few minutes out saying later, “I didn’t want a sprint finish with Taylor as I don’t think that would’ve gone well.” Knibb finished about 30 seconds back and the two training partners and friends shared exuberant hugs in the finish area .

It felt like the finish area was filled with camaraderie and respect unlike any race I had seen before. This wasn’t “new blood” so to speak, but in way it felt like a new group of champions and future champions were making their mark in St. George. At the press conference, the top five male and female finishers all were under the age of 28. It’s a young group who genuinely seem to enjoy each other.

Of the ten, eight raced together at the Collins Cup just four weeks prior. When asked if that played into the feeling of camaraderie, Sam Long said, “I do think we all got to know each other there. It also could be because we are all pretty young, it was a bit of a different atmosphere. And I also think the sport is changing, where you can talk smack but in a friendly way and at the end everyone knows it is for fun.”

Besides Coloradans, Long, Metzler and Knibb, several age group athletes made it in the top five. In no particular order. Colleen D’Reuck, Diana Hassel, Mike Wein, Eric Long (Sam’s dad), and Sandi Wiebe.

 

So what about Kona maybe moving to St. George?

St. George is an iconic venue with massive hills to run up and down. And the ride up Snow Canyon provides a separation point (along with an amazing picturesque backdrop) just before athletes start their run. There is speculation that the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona will move in the future and St. George seems primed to be a top choice. It has all the features that make a world championship course with hills, weather exposure, and a welcoming community and a downtown finish with plenty of potential to the house larger crowds seen in Kona. It is certainly more accessible than Kona and far less expensive for athletes, spectators and industry supporters.

Sand Hollow reservoir is great for the swim with plenty of room for transition. In Kona the iconic pier is busting at the seams with room (barely) for 1,800 athletes. In St. George 4,200 athletes competed. Undoubtedly the age group women probably don’t love the current format with the last group starting their swim at almost 10 o’clock. In normal years that would force them to be running at the hottest part of the day. This year, some had to be pulled out of the water with the rare thunderstorm that rolled through.

In previous years, the 70.3 Championship features two days of racing—one for the men and one for the women. In St. George that seems a difficult task with races not generally taking place on Sundays in Utah. It will be interesting to see what happens in the future. Next year the 70.3 Championship will return to St. George along with a full distance race in June. We shall see!

But for now, the young group of pro’s stole the show and perhaps this race will serve as a springboard for future success for all of these athletes as they scatter into the world doing more races. In fact, watch this coming weekend in Chattanooga where Sam Long will attempt defend his title as champion and battle rival Lionel Sander—keep an eye on that!

IRONMAN 70.3 Championship in St George

Results (ironman.com)

 

IRONMAN World Championship Returns to Kona in October 2022 with Two-Day Race Format

 

The 2021 Supersapiens IRONMAN World Championship will take place in St. George, Utah, on May 7, 2022, giving professional triathletes the opportunity to claim a world championship title and a share of the $750,000 prize purse that goes with it. The ongoing uncertainty regarding Kailua-Kona, Hawaii`s ability to host the event in February required a change in venue to outside of Hawai`i for the first time since the inaugural event in 1978.

St. George was selected as the first new host location of the event outside of Hawai`i in 40-plus years based on its strong community support, challenging course, and experience hosting IRONMAN® triathlons and other major events, including the successful recently completed 2021 Intermountain Healthcare IRONMAN 70.3® World Championship presented by Utah Sports Commission. St. George will also host the 2022 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship on October 28-29, 2022.

For the first time in the 40-plus year history of the IRONMAN World Championship, the pinnacle event for triathlon will take place over two days with the 2022 IRONMAN World Championship returning to Kona, Hawai`i on October 6 and 8, 2022. The two-day event will see an expanded women’s professional field of 50 athletes race on Thursday, October 6, and 50 professional men race on Saturday, October 8. Details of the age-group races will be communicated in the coming weeks.

“The loss of the past two IRONMAN World Championship races certainly dealt us an economic blow. Our restaurants have always received a big boost from the race, athletes, and their families. We are very excited to hear that with two races next October we can plan to make up for the economic losses from the past two race cancellations,” said Luana Hospitality Principal, Eric von Platen Luder

“It has been a challenging few years, however we have stayed true to our goal to create exceptional experiences for our ‘ohana,” said Diana Bertsch, Senior Vice President, World Championship Events for The IRONMAN Group. “We are grateful to our host communities in St. George and Kailua-Kona as well as their local and state officials, for their willingness to trust us. Our team is committed to putting on incredible race weeks as we add pages to the IRONMAN World Championship history books in May and October 2022.” 

IRONMAN athletes registered for the 2021 and 2022 editions of the IRONMAN World Championship triathlon, along with athletes currently registered for 2022 IRONMAN St. George, will be contacted directly with additional information.

For more information and event details for the IRONMAN World Championship, please visit www.ironman.com/im-world-championship.

 

IRONMAN Chattanooga Pro Rankings by TriRating

https://www.trirating.com/ironman-chattanooga-2021-sept-26-seedings/

 

 

When Her Friend Crashed at Worlds, She Gave Up Her Own Race to Help

Would you DNF to give aid to a fellow competitor?

SEPTEMBER 22, 2021

SUSAN LACKE

  

When Emily Hippen and Tristen Rogers qualified for the Ironman 70.3 World Championship together at Steelhead 70.3 earlier this year, they immediately began making plans for a joint trip to St. George.

“We were in the same age group, and so excited to have both made the cut,” said Hippen. “We had been talking about this big race and planning our time in St. George for months.”

As members of the same triathlon team, HAT House Altitude Team in Denver, Colorado, the two were already frequent training buddies. But in St. George, they became more than that; they became close friends with an unbreakable bond. The pivotal moment came at mile 40 of the world championship race, when a freak storm blew through the course, bringing high winds, hail, and lightning. Approximately 70 age-group women who were still in the midst of the swim in Sand Hollow were pulled from the water; Hippen and Rogers were just a few miles into the bike leg.

“I was on a climb when I saw about 20 or 30 women just standing on the side of the road,” said Rogers. “I thought that Ironman was halting the race for our safety, until the worst of the storm passed, and was preparing to stop. But then realized, when I got to the top of the climb, that these women had voluntarily pulled over because they were literally being blown off their bikes and some looked fearful for their safety. The bike ride at that point instantly became one of survival, and not of performance.”

Rogers continued on, her knuckles white from the tight grip on her handlebars. After all, this was a world championship race— the first one since 2019—and she was determined to make it to the finish. Besides, she reasoned, the storm would surely pass.

Meanwhile, Hippen was just ahead of her teammate on the course (“I’d been pushing all day to stay ahead of her,” she said) with the same white knuckles. She, too, was waiting for the storm to pass, when she reasoned the ride would become much easier. Just before a pivotal turn in the course, Rogers finally laid eyes on her teammate—but not the way she expected.

“I heard a bunch of women ahead of me scream, and looked up and literally saw feet in the air and then a body hit the ground,” said Rogers. “It happened so fast.”

Hippen, unconscious after crashing during the bike leg at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship. (Photo: Courtesy of Emily Hippen)

Rogers didn’t realize it was her teammate who she’d seen fly into the air until she stopped to give aid. Hippen was unconscious, her eyes rolled back in her head. While other athletes hurried ahead to alert medical authorities at the aid station, Rogers stayed with her friend. A volunteer arrived to assist, and Rogers gave what information she could—Hippen’s name, the name of her husband, and a phone number. When an ambulance arrived minutes later, Rogers was thanked for her help and told she could resume her race. Though the storm had finally passed by then, she couldn’t bring herself to finish the race. After riding her bike back into town, she turned in her timing chip, racked her bike, and immediately headed for the hospital.

Hippen, thankfully, was fine—banged up, to be sure, but expected to make a full recovery. In her post-crash fog, she was especially surprised to see Rogers.

“Tristen stayed with me at the hospital, helped my husband get there, picked up my prescriptions, and got me back to our Airbnb,” Hippen said. “She did it all. All while she could have been finishing a race that was very important to her.”

For Rogers, taking the DNF wasn’t a difficult decision. “I don’t think I would have been happy with myself had I not stopped. I want to promote all things good about being a positive member of our endurance community,” she said. “On our team website, one of the examples we have for people who are interested in joining is, ‘If you wouldn’t stop and help someone on the side of the road because it is going to mess up your data/Strava/personal record, then we probably are not the team for you.’”

While Hippen recovers, she’ll be cheering on her friend who plans to finish her race via a self-supported 70.3 in Denver. The two have plans to qualify again for 70.3 Worlds and, this time, to finish together.

“Tristen is a model athlete,” said Hippen. “Being a champion is so much more than crossing the finish line ahead of others. It means being a champion of fellow athletes and giving selflessly to others. And Tristen is a true champion.”

 

What's New in the 303:

Pioneers Win Oktoberfest Sprint Triathlon

LONGMONT, Colo. – The University of Denver Triathlon Team won the women's team event at the 2021 Oktoberfest Sprint at Union Reservoir on Sunday morning, taking each of the top-five spots and placing all nine of its athletes in the top 16.

Denver freshman Freya McKinley, competing in only her second collegiate race, won the individual women's competition in a total time of 1:03:28. Graduate student Emily Pincus followed in second place at 1:05:17, while freshman Avarie Faulkner finished less than a minute later (1:06:10) to round out the podium for the Pioneers. Freshmen Olivia Ebenstein (1:06:26) and Bella Chirafisi (1:07:25) joined their teammates in the top five.

The race was the DU program's first-ever in its home state.

"It was just a dominating performance, wire-to-wire," said head coach Barbara Perkins. "They mixed it up a little bit with their positions during the race, but it was a super exciting meet for us. We're just so thrilled to be here, back to racing in our home state and just show what we can do. It was a strong showing, but we still have a lot more to prove this season."

Also finishing for the Pioneers were senior Amanda Ballard in 11th (1:13:48), junior Stormy Hegg in 13th (1:14:57) and freshman Marta Meinardi in 16th (1:16:13). For Hegg and Meinardi, the race represented their first as collegians. Senior Grace Arlandson was among the leaders following the swim and was the first into the second transition after the bike leg, but she didn't complete the race as she was a pre-planned DNF.

Pincus led all women out of the 750-meter swim in Union Reservoir and was followed closely behind by teammates Meinardi, Chirafisi, Arlandson, McKinley and Ebenstein. The Pioneers held each of the first seven spots heading into the first transition, and it was a lead they never relinquished in the race

McKinley posted the fourth-fastest swim at 9:31 and moved out to the front heading into the run after recording the second-fastest bike time, finishing the 12.9-mile non-draft ride at 32:59, six seconds behind Arlandson. She completed the 5-kilometer run in 19 minutes and 12 seconds, the best mark among the women.

"It was a phenomenal race, I really enjoyed it," McKinley said. "Being out there with everybody and having the motivation of the other girls and the support was so nice. To be able to race a local race in Colorado was awesome."

The University of Colorado came in second place in the women's team event after placing athletes in each of the 6-10 spots, while the Air Force Academy finished third.

Barbara Perkins was named the University of Denver's first triathlon head coach in program history in July 2020 and is in her second season in that position in fall 2021.

In the inaugural 2020-21 campaign, Perkins guided the program’s first season that featured three DU triathletes finishing in the top 10 in the Pioneers’ only collegiate race: the Clermont Challenge in Florida in March 2021.

Perkins joined the University of Denver as an assistant coach for the men’s and women’s swimming and diving team in November 2019 and served two seasons full-time in that position. Her role as the triathlon head coach was converted to a full-time position on July 21, 2021.

 

Video Of The Week:

Lucy Charles "Pure Joy" Finish at IRONMAN 70.3 World Champs in St George

https://www.instagram.com/tv/CUI1PPmpQFp/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

 

Closing:

Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it!

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Sep 18, 2021

This week we have Gold medalist and current 70.3 world record holder, Kristian Blummenfelt joining us to talk about the Tokyo Olympic Triathlon win and his outlook for IRONMAN 70.3 St George.

Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD

 

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In Today's Show

  • Feature interview with Kristian Blummenfelt
  • Endurance News
    • IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in St George
    • Kristian Blummenfelt sprints to Edmonton win and World Championship double
  • What's new in the 303?
    • Pro race insights from Jocelyn McCauley
    • 8 of Colorado's crazy tests on foot and bike - Springs Gazette

Interview Sponsor: UCAN

Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!

 

You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at

ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

Interview with Kristian Blummenfelt

A multiple Norwegian Triathlon Champion and IRONMAN 70.3 Champion, Kristian Blummenfelt is one of the fastest triathletes in the world over the middle distance. 

 

Kristian was originally a swimmer, but also excelled on his feet by competing at the 2011 European Cross-Country Championships as a junior and showcasing the necessary tools to excel in the sport of triathlon.

 

Blummenfelt prospered as a junior, winning numerous events. Victories at ITU Junior European Cup events in Brno, Tabor and Antalya were followed by a Senior ITU victory at Tartu. His first major success came at the 2015 European Championship where he picked up a bronze medal.

 

Kristian’s Norwegian National titles came in 2015, 2016 and 2018, and now he was also showing off his talents on the IRONMAN 70.3 circuit. He notched three consecutive victories in Bahrain between 2017 and 2019, and in both the 2018 and 2019 renewals set new world records for the half-IRONMAN.

 

2019 was a highly successful campaign for the Norwegian as he was also crowned winner of the ITU World Triathlon Series Grand Final. He finished a highly creditable fourth meanwhile at the 70.3 World Championship in Nice, a race won by one of his training partners Gustav Iden.

 

Kristian is also an Olympian, having competed at the 2016 Rio Games where he finished in 13th place.  He won gold at the Tokyo 2021, won again in Edmonton and World Championship double August 21st.

 

Blummenfelt’s sporting hero growing up was Alexander Dale Oen, a swimmer from his native Norway and a European champion in 2008.  Unsurprisingly for someone who has set those world records, Kristian’s motto is “go big or go home”.

 

Kristian Blummenfelt (protriathletes.org)

 

Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance.

It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy’s mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!

 

Endurance News:

 

Kristian Blummenfelt sprints to Edmonton win and World Championship double

Win or lose (and this year it has mostly been the former for the Norwegian), Kristian Blummenfelt impacts more races than anyone else. So powerful is his cycling ability and mentality, you feel as though he is on a mission to challenge anyone who thinks they can breakaway on the bike (from him) and win.

 

The result of that – for me at least, and it has been the case for some time now – is that the first major measure I look at during a race is not who is leading the swim, who is in the lead pack, is there a break etc. It’s, “did you exit the swim ahead, or behind Kristian Blummenfelt?”

 

Ahead, and – if you have the legs to follow him – you gain access to the world’s greatest domestique (!) to help overcome any swim deficit. If you are behind and you miss the Blu Train… expect a very difficult next 90 minutes.

 

And that, perhaps, is the primary reason why Great Britain’s Alex Yee wasn’t able to challenge for world championship gold on Saturday in Edmonton, despite producing the fastest run by a long way. Blummenfelt swam 18:36, Alex 18:53. Those 17 seconds would prove impossible to recover from.

 

Preview of the Showdown in St. George at IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships

303 is heading to St. George to bring you in-person coverage of the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships. With no Kona this year, all eyes are on the desert of southwest Utah. With a hilly run course, fast bike and a predicted temperature near 100 degrees, the real sizzle isn’t the rubber meeting the road, it’s the clash of top triathletes on heels of the Collins Cup that has no doubt sparked some rivalries.

In the women’s field in particular, the match up of Daniela Ryf and Taylor Knibb seems most intriguing. At the Collins Cup they went head to head and Knibb had the biggest victory of the day of all athletes crushing Daniela by double digit minutes. But Daniela reportedly wasn’t feeling her best and we all know of the four time IRONMAN World Champion capabilities. No doubt she is looking for some revenge. Obviously as the championship, the field is stacked. Maybe there is a chink in Ryf’s armor? Maybe not, but Lucy Charles, Ellie Salthouse, Sky Moench, Paula Findlay and Jeanni Metzler, all with great races in Slovakia could be in the mix at the end. No doubt there are others like Holly Lawrence who crashed in the Collins Cup could fight for the podium.

 

The mens field offers similar drama with Sam Long, the top ranked American and one of the favorites will have stiff competition from Lionel Sanders, Gustav Iden and fellow Norwegian and Olympic Gold Medalist Kristian Blummenfelt. Last May, Long and Sanders battled shoulder to shoulder in St. George and the two have had some fun social media banter in the last 12 months. After the race in May, Long said he knew he could take advantage of the downhill with his long stride and he did so almost winning so it will be interesting to see what happens.

 

The Norwegians are going to be tough to beat. Both Iden and Blummenfelt have had fantastic seasons. Iden handedly won his race in Slovakia and Blummenfelt has focused on training for St. George since winning Olympic gold. With no Jan Frodeno, putting odds on this race is challenging. There are many podium worthy contenders like Chris Leiferman, Rudy Von Berg, Alistair Brownlee, Ben Kanute, Javier Gomez, Sam Appleton and maybe a dark horse to watch is Collin Chartier from Louisville, Colorado.

 

What's New in the 303:

 

Pro Race Insights from Jocelyn McCauley

 

https://303cycling.com/cyclists-4-community-raffling-off-new-cervelo-to-raise-money/

 

8 of Colorado's crazy tests on foot and bike: Jagged alpine to rowdy singletrack at night

Here’s a nod to some of the state’s most infamous challenges spanning 100-plus miles:

 

Hardrock 100

Clearly, lockdowns of last year fueled ambitions. Example: François D’haene’s record dash over the San Juan Mountains this summer. The French man became the first in the fearsome race’s 28-year history to clock a time under 22 hours — stunning, considering the 100 miles and 33,000 feet of climbing in the jagged alpine around Silverton, Telluride and Ouray. Lottery-based entry, race is usually mid-July.

 

LEADVILLE 100 RACE

Andy Fox of Evergreen, Colo. rides his bike near Twin Lakes during the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race Saturday, August 14, 2010 in Leadville, Colo.

 

Gazette file

Leadville Trail 100

This is a classic in the ultra world. Where miners once flocked for gold, now runners and mountain bikers race to finish within demanding cutoffs (30 hours for runners, 12 for cyclists). It’s a test of lung power, starting from North America’s highest incorporated town near 10,200 feet and rising to Hope Pass above 12,600 feet. It’s better known as Hopeless Pass. Lottery-based, races in late August.

 

Run Rabbit Run

Are you a tortoise or a hare? That is the first question to ask when approaching this 100-mile sufferfest from Steamboat Springs. While gaining 20,000 feet of elevation, you’ll be covering parts of the Continental Divide and the town’s recognizable summits: Mount Werner and Emerald and Rabbit Ears mountains. Hares finish under 36 hours, tortoises under 30. Usually mid-September.

 

Flaming Foliage Relay

This 165-mile overnighter showcases autumn’s aspen glow where it is famously glorious, along Guanella, Georgia and Fremont passes. Running teams might struggle to admire the beauty. Their heads are down on the course between Idaho Springs and Buena Vista, crossing roads and trails amounting to about 17,000 vertical feet. Usually mid-September.

 

Triple Bypass

In 1988, a group of cycling buddies thought it would be fun to ride from Evergreen to Vail. Ever since, that’s been the idea of fun for riders traversing a trio of heart-pounding passes over 100-plus miles and 10,000-plus feet. An exclusive bunch has made it a “double triple” in recent years, pedaling back the way they came. Slated for late July/early August 2022.

 

Breck 100

Mountain bikers have come to know this, not the Leadville 100, as Colorado’s ultimate endeavor on a saddle — a tantalizing route shaped like a clover leaf, crossing the Continental Divide three times. But the race has been on hold for two years; the pandemic again caused a cancellation this summer. And the past two plans were a condensed course, closer to 70 miles. Will the real Breck 100 return? “That’s the million-dollar question,” says organizer Thane Wright. Previously mid to late July.

 

SBT GRVL

Colorado’s gravel revolution begins in Steamboat Springs, a cycling town proud of its crunchy backroads. This race has risen to prominence with a variety of endurance courses amid classic scenery. They have recently ranged from nearly 40 miles to more than 140 miles, with climbing between 2,000 and 9,400 feet. Slated for Aug. 22, 2022.


Vapor Trail 125

Any ultra competitor knows about “sleep demons,” those hallucinations that manifest at night. That’s when this whacky mountain bike foray begins, in the darkness of 10 p.m. It begins in Salida, where some of the whackiest riders reside, molded by the vaunted Monarch Crest. Vapor is reserved for the most skilled and wilderness prepared. One must negotiate technical singletrack by headlamp and sustain long climbs over 125 miles. Slated for Aug. 26, 2022.

 

 

Video Of The Week:

Kristian Blummenfelt History Maker

 

Closing:

Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it!

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Sep 11, 2021

This week we have Collin Chartier back from the Collin's Cup in Slovakia. Collin matched Kyle Smith on the swim and Gustav Iden on the bike. Collin beat out Kyle for a 2nd place and 2 points for the USA.  We're looking forward to hearing about their 3-way battle and the Collin's Cup in general.

Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD

 

We’re huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation.

 

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Guys, it’s super easy to go take this quiz on their website. Just go to vengacbd.com/quiz and (you didn’t hear it from us but…) there’s a freebie in it for you just for taking the quiz.

 

We trust these guys 100% and they’ll make it really easy for you to get started with the RIGHT CBD.

 

 Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).

 

In Today's Show

  • Feature interview with Collin Chartier
  • Endurance News
    • IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in St George
    • Julie Moss Award at The Collin's Cup
  • What's new in the 303?
    • Sebastian's new Scott bike at Lookout last week
    • Buff Classic
    • 303 and Channel 7

 

Interview Sponsor: UCAN

Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!

 

You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at

ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

Interview with Collin Chartier

Collin discovered the sport of triathlon at 14 years old as a swimmer, with a background in playing football and mountain biking.

 

There is nothing more satisfying to Collin than achieving his potential through hard work, persistence, and self-belief.  A month ago he came in 3rd at Ironman Boulder 70.3.  Got a ticket to the Collin's Cup and then crushed out a 2nd place to Gustav Iden and is back in Boulder.  Let's chat with Collin Chartier.

 

 

Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance.

It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy’s mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!

 

Endurance News:

 

PROFESSIONAL TRIATHLETES ORGANISATION ANNOUNCES LIONEL SANDERS AND HOLLY LAWRENCE AS WINNERS OF THE JULIE MOSS AWARD FOR COURAGEOUS PERFORMANCES AT THE COLLINS CUP

The Professional Triathletes Organisation today announced that Team Internationals’ Lionel Sanders and Team Europe’s Holly Lawrence have been awarded the Julie Moss Award for their courageous performances at The Collins Cup.

 

The Julie Moss Award is named after Julie Moss, whose performance at the 1982 World Championship in Kona, in which she collapsed and crawled across the finish line, has come to signify the indomitable spirit of triathlon. In many ways she is the inspiration of the PTO’s motto, “Dum Spiro Spero,” which means “Whilst I breathe, I hope.”

 

The many gutsy performances at the Collins Cup made this decision extremely difficult. From Team Internationals’ Kyle Smith racing with one aerobar after crashing, to an unwell Daniela Ryf of Team Europe pushing herself on the run to earn three vital points, from the outstanding performance by American Chelsea Sodaro barely six months after the arrival of her baby Skye, to the mad sprint by Team Internationals’ Jackson Laundry in the final two kilometres to win his match, the day was filled with grit and determination. But the performances of Sanders and Lawrence particularly captivated the fans and showcased the meaning of The Collins Cup.

 

Canadian Lionel Sanders, the spiritual leader of Team Internationals, arrived at the event having finished second at IRONMAN Copenhagen only six days before. However, nothing was going to stop him leaving his body and soul on the racecourse for the PTO’s flagship event. Sanders not only competed on just six days rest from a full distance race, but he then rose from the pavement after a bike crash to win his match against Europe’s Sebastian Kienle and USA’s Andrew Starykowicz.

 

Simon Whitfield, Olympic Gold Medal winner and Team Internationals Captain, commented, “There is literally no way to describe Lionel Sanders. You can exhaust your Thesaurus with words like relentless, indomitable, unyielding, driven, inexorable, and never come close to describing what Lionel Sanders is or does. You can only conclude it is beyond the realm of human comprehension. In everything the man does he lives his mantra to have “NO LIMITS.” It was an honour to be his Captain and experience his passion and spirit.“

 

For the women, Europe’s Holly Lawrence personifies the values of the Collins Cup. One of the marquee matches against fierce rival Ellie Salthouse from Team Internationals was turning out to be well and truly epic as the women battled side-by-side for every stroke of the swim, colliding numerous times as each refused to yield a centimetre. It was triathlon’s equivalent of Ali v. Fraser fought in the waters of the Danube River. Lawrence led on the bike until disaster struck, and she crashed not far from T-2. Bloodied, she rose immediately to continue the fight, but her damaged bike took almost five minutes to repair as she waited helplessly. She watched both Salthouse and USA’s Skye Moench pass her and saw her chance to win the match evaporate. Bike repaired but spirit unbroken, she rode into transition to a standing ovation. With no chance to win her match, she nonetheless persevered in the run and denied Team USA and Team International bonus points, thus helping Team Europe to victory.

 

Natascha Badmann, Team Europe Captain, noted, “Holly Lawrence’s performance was an inspiration to our team. We had already lost points in Match No. 1 with the tremendous performance of USA’s Taylor Knibb. If Holly was not able to continue, we would have lost an additional 1-1/2 points. With grit and determination, she battled back to deny both Team USA and Team Internationals 1-1/2 vital points. This did not go unnoticed by the fans and the rest of Team Europe, who were not prepared to see Holly’s effort be in vain.”

 

Lawrence mentioned in her post-race interview that if it had been a normal championship race, she would not have continued after it took so long to mend her bike, but since she was racing for Team Europe, she was willing to sacrifice her personal goals for those of the team.

 

What's New in the 303:


Sebastian’s New Bike, Communities Uniting and More Contributors Than You Might Think

Thank you for your trust. Thank you for your patience. Thank you for your vulnerability and it was honor to ride with you last Friday. You thanked me so kindly and closed your text later that day by saying “God bless you and your family.” I do feel blessed.

But what you don’t know, what most don’t know is the whole story, and I want to share with you my thoughts and feelings and how much the community made this possible.

 

Buff Classic adds Gravel Route, Still Openings for Sept 12th Ride.

The Buff Classic has added the Dirty Epic which is a mixed surface course featuring some smooth asphalt, buff gravel, and some pretty epic Jeep road style descending. The ride starts up Boulder Canyon, which will be closed to cars, and turns up Magnolia Road around 4 miles up Boulder Canyon.  Magnolia is steep, averaging over 9% for the first 4+ miles, with some sections nearing 20%.  Whatever bike you are riding, be sure it has good climbing gears. Bikes that are 1x in the front will need a 40″ on the back.

 

303 and Channel 7

 

Closing:

Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it!

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Sep 4, 2021

Welcome to Episode #300 of the 303 Endurance Podcast. You are listening to your weekly connection to coaches, experts, and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance goals. We're your hosts coach Rich Soares and 303 Chief Bill Plock.  Thanks for joining us for another week of endurance interviews and discussion. 

Can you believe episode 300?

Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD

 

We’re huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation.

 

Venga offers personalized CBD plans. All you have to do is take a simple quiz to get you started! Answer a few questions and, voila - there’s your personalized CBD recommendation! It’s all based on YOU - what CBD YOU need right now to meet your goals.

 

Guys, it’s super easy to go take this quiz on their website. Just go to vengacbd.com/quiz and (you didn’t hear it from us but…) there’s a freebie in it for you just for taking the quiz.

 

We trust these guys 100% and they’ll make it really easy for you to get started with the RIGHT CBD.

 

 Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).

 

In Today's Show

  • Feature discussion on "being fit does not mean you are healthy (disease free)"
    • TriDoc Jeff Sankoff Episode #73 on Tim O'Donnell's heart attack
    • My heart CT scan results
  • Endurance News
    • Collin's Cup
    • Paralympic Paratriathlon Results & watch party
    • Ironman PR on IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship and Pros racing in St George
    • New Dura Ace
  • What's new in the 303?
    • Gravel Rules
    • Golden Ride today and Sebastian's new Scott bike
  • TriDot introduction and overview

 

Interview Sponsor: UCAN

Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!

 

You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at

ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co

 

TriDoc on Tim O'Donnell's Heart Attack

The Tri Doc, Jeff Sankoff Shares Insight on Heart Health in Wake of Tim O’Donnell’s Heart Attack

Recently Emergency Room Physician and very accomplished IRONMAN veteran athlete Dr. Jeff Sankoff shared on his podcast, thoughts on heart health and specifically talking about what probably happened with Tim O’Donnell and what that means for triathletes in general.

 

In this podcast he replays a conversation with USA Triathlon CEO Rocky Harris who reveals some health issues he has overcome and warns triathletes to know your health history and get check ups. The overall message it seems is that simply being fit doesn’t mean you are healthy. That fitness does not overcome something like heart disease.

 

Dr. Sankoff brings in his colleague Dr. Matt Holland, a cardiology specialist at Denver Health. They discuss some very specific factors about things like what causes heart attacks versus cardiac arrest. What really is the “widow” maker and how so many different things can cause a multitude of outcomes. But the conversation is also re-assuring in terms of how most all of us can avoid these things and how rare it really is for someone like Tim O’Donnell to have experienced this.

 

Go here; https://www.tridocpodcast.com/episode/episode-73-bonus-episode-tim-odonnels-heart-attack-what-does-this-mean-for-the-rest-of-us

 

Dr. Sankoff is dedicated to helping triathletes (athletes) train healthy and his podcast features many great topics and guest dedicated to this mission. His website is https://tridoccoaching.com. Learn more about him here and subscribe to his podcast.

 

My Personal Experience with Heart CT Scan - SimonMed here in Denver.

 

Cardiac Calcium Scoring (Heart Scan) is a medical scan of coronary calcium

The coronary arteries are the vessels that supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart. Plaque — made of fat, calcium and other substances — can build up and narrow or close the arteries.

 

To detect this build-up, your physician may order cardiac calcium scoring — a test that is also known as coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring, a heart scan or calcium score.  This non-invasive CT scan (computed tomography) of the heart calculates your risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) by measuring the amount of calcified plaque in the coronary arteries.

 

Plaque or calcium build-up in the coronary arteries causes heart disease or can lead to a heart attack. The coronary calcium scan is a better predictor of coronary events than cholesterol screening or other risk factor assessments.

 

About Your CAC Score

A calcium score (sometimes called an Agatston score) is calculated based on the amount of plaque observed in the CT scan. It may be converted to a percentile rank based on your age and gender. The results from your cardiac scoring will be sent to your doctor.  Mine was a score of 26 and the 4th percentile of my age peers.

 

Your likelihood of having heart disease or a heart attack correlates with your calcium scoring. The lower your calcium score and percentile rank, the less likely you are to have a cardiac event compared to other men or women your age.

 

Calcium Score Results

The purpose of the test is to understand your risk of heart attack or disease, taking preventive or corrective measures based on the results.

 

If you have any plaque present (a score greater than 0), your doctor may make recommendations for lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, eating better and exercising more. The higher your score the more treatment your doctor may recommend.

 

If you have a high score, you can make an appointment with one of our coronary artery disease specialists.

 

Zero: No plaque. Your risk of heart attack is low.

 

1 - 10: Small amount of plaque. You have less than a 10 percent chance of having heart disease, and your risk of heart attack is low.

 

11-100: Some plaque. You have mild heart disease and a moderate chance of heart attack. Your doctor may recommend other treatment in addition to lifestyle changes.

 

101 - 400: Moderate amount of plaque. You have heart disease and plaque may be blocking an artery. Your chance of having a heart attack is moderate to high. Your health professional may want more tests and may start treatment.

 

Over 400: Large amount of plaque. You have more than a 90 percent chance that plaque is blocking one of your arteries. Your chance of heart attack is high. Your health professional will want more tests and will start treatment.

 

 

Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance.

It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy’s mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!

 

Endurance News:

 

USA Triathlon 2020 U.S. Paralympic Triathlon Team

https://triathlon.org/results/result/2020_tokyo_paralympic_games/508225

 

  • Elizabeth Baker (Signal Mountain, Tenn.), guided by Jillian Elliott (Gig Harbor, Wash.), Women’s PTVI
  • 2016 U.S. Paralympian
  • Jamie Brown (Oceanside, Calif.), Men’s PTS4
  • Kyle Coon (Colorado Springs, Colo.), guided by Andy Potts (Colorado Springs, Colo.), Men’s PTVI
  • Hailey Danz (Colorado Springs, Colo.), Women’s PTS2
  • Amy Dixon (Encinitas, Calif.), guided by Kirsten Sass (McKenzie, Tenn.), Women’s PTVI
  • Kelly Elmlinger (San Antonio, Texas), Women’s PTS5 (classing up from PTS4)
  • Kendall Gretsch (Downers Grove, Ill.), Women’s PTWC
  • Chris Hammer (Elkins, W.V.), Men’s PTS5
  • Eric McElvenny (Pittsburgh, Pa.), Men’s PTS4
  • Grace Norman (Jamestown, Ohio), Women’s PTS5
  • Allysa Seely (Glendale, Ariz.), Women’s PTS2
  • Brad Snyder (Baltimore, Md.), guided by Greg Billington (San Francisco, Calif.), Men’s PTVI
  • Melissa Stockwell (Colorado Springs, Colo.), Women’s PTS2

 

 

The Collins Cup, Even Super Bowl One Didn’t Sell Out, But it Was a Pretty Good Start–a Few Ideas for the Future

 

Race Results

Rich's Picks - PTO Fantasy Game - Predict & Play (protriathletes.org)

 

Triathlon’s “Super Bowl” happened today in Slovakia, it was called the Collins Cup. Yes we have Kona and the IRONMAN World Championships but that is about individuals, today was about the teams and the sport and profession of triathlon.

 

The Collins Cup was designed to mirror golf’s popular Ryder Cup pitting three teams of 12 athletes (6 men, 6 women) against each other. One team from Europe, the United States and Internationals.

 

The goal, to make professional triathlon a better spectator sport thus attracting more money to make the profession more lucrative and sustainable.

 

Will it work? Did it work? It’s too early to say but nobody predicted the wild popularity of the Super Bowl. Triathlon will never be that popular but lets see what happens.

 

The Professional Triathlon Organisation orchestrated this “made for TV event”. Viewers watched 12 matches with one competitor from each team racing. Each match started 10 minutes apart. The entire race lasted about 5 hours. Cameras were all over the course capturing the 36 athletes racing in their own three person race. It was fun to watch and the coverage was good as was the announcing. It was especially fun to have Tour de France commentator Phil Liggett behind the mic. His voice just adds a tone of familiarity and importance.

 

IRONMAN 70.3 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship presented by the Utah Sports Commission. Among them will be over 100 of the world’s top professional triathletes who will battle for a piece of the $350,000 USD total professional prize purse and the title of IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion.

 

Since the first IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship was held in 2006 the women’s race has seen 10 different champions from five different countries. Swiss Daniela Ryf has won an event-best five times, and is coming off an undefeated season, including a win in St. George at the IRONMAN 70.3 North American Championship earlier this year. Together with Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) and Leanda Cave (GBR), Ryf also holds the distinction of having won both the IRONMAN World Championship® and the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship.

 

Aiming to dethrone Ryf will be a stellar group of professional female triathletes, including Lucy Charles-Barclay (GBR), who is coming off a recent win at 2021 IRONMAN 70.3 European Championship Elsinore. Charles-Barclay edged out Holly Lawrence (GBR) in that event, who as the 2016 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion and multiple-time IRONMAN 70.3 winner will also be aiming for the top podium spot in St. George. Additional global competition will come from Paula Findlay (CAN), Taylor Knibb (USA), Kat Matthews (GBR), Skye Moench (USA), Emma Pallant-Browne (GBR), and Ellie Salthouse (AUS), each of whom continue to impress on the IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 circuits.

 

On the men’s side, a star-studded field of professional talent will come together aiming to create history in St. George. With no clear frontrunner, a few of the dominant competitors that could take a shot for a podium spot include the defending IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion from 2019 in Nice, France, Gustav Iden (NOR); Kristian Blummenfelt (NOR), who has momentum coming into St. George following his recent Tokyo 2020 Olympic Triathlon win; and Lionel Sanders (CAN), who won the IRONMAN 70.3 North American Championship in St. George earlier this year and has over 20 IRONMAN 70.3 wins to his name. Also in contention are Alistair Brownlee (GBR), the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Triathlon Gold Medalist as well as Javier Gomez (ESP), the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion and 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship third place podium finisher. Finally, American’s Ben Kanute (USA) and Sam Long (USA) look to claim home nation victories. Kanute has multiple IRONMAN 70.3 wins and podium finishes in recent years and a second-place finish at the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship, the last time the event was held on US soil. Sam Long comes in on the top of his game having won the 2021 IRONMAN Coeur d’Alene triathlon and the 2021 IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder triathlon.

 

 

What's New in the 303:

  • New Dura Ace?
  • Gravel Rules

 

My Experience With TriDot

What is TriDot?  It's a training platform, but its pretty sophisticated.  It takes your race goals, your training data, puts threshold test on your training calendar, takes those threshold test results and uses AI to automatically adjusts your training plan and workouts.  You can also see your Threshold Test history and drill into the details.  It tracks your Fitness, Stress and Readiness on a graph. 

 

TriDot also has an integrated App called RaceX.  Within RaceX, you can pick your "A" and "B" races (Ironman and Challenge branded).  You can browse race routes for any of the races in the database and look at the gps route, elevation and distance.  You can also see your Threshold Test history and drill into the details.  It tracks your Fitness, Stress and Readiness on a graph. 

 

Within Diagnostics there's a feature called Phyiogenomics.  If you've used DNA-based ancestry services like Ancestry.com or 23 and Me, there is a downloadable text file that has your genome that can be used for things like nutrigenomics (using your DNA or genome data to understand if you have genetic markers for celiac disease or allergies), or pharma genomics (using genome data to treat/prevent disease. We have a mutual friend who learned she had DNA markers putting her at likely risk for breast cancer. 

 

TriDot has a feature called PhysiogenomiX. It uses your DNA (genome data) to tailor the training plan and workouts to your genetic profile.   I uploaded my 23 and Me genome text file to TriDot.  Within a few seconds TriDot gave me an analysis that includes categorical summary and detailed results from specific genes related to physical training. These genes shown (and others) are used to enhance your training optimization.

 

The categories:

Training Intensity Response is a relative measure of how you respond to high-intensity versus low-intensity training. Based on your genetic variations, you are predisposed to have a greater response to either high or low-intensity training.

Aerobic Potential is a measure of your potential for developing a high aerobic capacity or high oxygen utilization (VO2max). This is not a measure of your current aerobic capacity. Rather, it is a measure of your aerobic trainability--your potential for improvement with proper training.

Recovery Rate is a measure of your genetic ability to recover from exercise-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. This includes the level of stress and inflammation produced and the rate at which it is cleared.

Injury Predisposition is a measure of how genetically prone you are to incurring soft tissue (tendon and ligament) injuries from training.

 

Lauren has also done it and we compared our results.  We took the very first category of Training Intensity Response.  At the top level we were both categorized as 40% responsive to Power vs 60% responsive to Endurance.  When you drill into the details, each Gene, the Result, Effect and a summary.

 

At the gene level we had about a half dozen genes that were different.  In the first gene, Lauren had a piece of DNA inserted and I had both of them deleted.

 

ACE: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

I have both deleted (DD) so I tend to be respond better to power based training.  Lauren tends to respond well to a mixture of power and endurance.

VEGFA: Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

Tends to be highly responsive to endurance training with good muscle efficiency and VO2max. Tends to adjust well to altitude training. Var-allele carriers produce a greater amount of VEGF.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT TO KNOW BEFORE DIGGING INTO YOUR GENETICS

Your genetic makeup is only part of the equation.

Genetics alone is insufficient to predict or identify talent.

Genetics can’t (shouldn’t) be used to set or change your goals; rather, to help you reach your goals most effectively.

 

Video of the Week:

Team Europe Win First-Ever PTO Collins Cup | Race Reaction & Highlights

 

 

 

Closing:

Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it!

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

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