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Mile High Endurance Podcast

Mile High Endurance Podcast is recorded in the Rocky Mountain front range area in Denver, Colorado. 55 miles to the north is the triathlon 'Mecca' of Boulder, home of some of the most prominent pros in triathlon and related sports. 56 miles to the south is the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. The Olympic Complex in Colorado Springs is the flagship training center for the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Olympic Training Center programs. The 110 mile stretch between Boulder and Colorado Springs is one of the fittest and athletic populated areas in the world. I share these statistics, not so much to brag but to give you the listener context for what the culture and vibe is here in the Mile High area. ​The objective of the Mile High Endurance Podcast is to connect you to the triathlon community and empower you to achieve your triathlon and fitness goals. Each month we will take subjects that you are interested in and connect your interests with news, expert interviews, and information about services and products in a way that inform your decisions to achieve your full potential in the sport.
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Now displaying: Page 1
Apr 8, 2018

Our guest this week is Dr. Jason Karp to talk about his article "The Right Way to Do Run Intervals".  He has a PhD in exercise physiology, a Masters in Kinesiology and a BA in exercise and sports science.  He's been a guest in the past on his books, The Inner Runner and Run Your Fat Off.   We are certain you will learn some new information about interval training and how that create the adaptations that make you faster and stronger.

Thanks to last week's guest, Tim Hola on his favorite swim, bike and run workouts.  For those who heard and told us how much you liked it, thank you for your feedback.  If you missed it, go back and listen to episode #119.

Tim's Favorite Workouts:

Swim:

Workout 1

  • 1000 straight fast; last 200 water polo (1 min RI)
  • 1000 straight; last 200 water polo (45 sec RI)
  • 1000 straight; last 200 water polo (30 sec RI)
  • 1000 straight; last 200 water polo

Workout 2

  • 4225 straight sprinkling in intensity 200s and 300s here and there.  non stop and no drinking.

Bike:

Workout 1

  • 90 seconds hard as you can; 60 seconds harder; 60 seconds steady; 30 seconds rest (repeat 5 times)
  • 10-15 minutes spin
  • 45 minute time trial

 

Workout 2

  • 20 minute intervals at race pace (hard as he can for 20 minutes) with 5 minutes rest (repeat 5 times)

Run:

Workout 1

  • After a good warmup
  • Hill repeats 45 seconds hard up, easy down; 30 seconds hard uphill, easy down 15 seconds hard uphill, easy down (repeat 5 times) 

Discussion Teasers:

  • Cherry Creek Time Trial
  • New Triathlete Tip - How's and Why's of Following a Triathlon Training Workout
  • Bills countdown to Ironman Boulder
  • Physiology and gait analysis at CU Sports Medicine
  • Resilience Code Tour

Interview Setup

Jason Karp is a prolific writer, he has more than 400 articles published in running, coaching, and fitness magazines and scientific journals and is the author of eight books, including The Inner Runner, Run Your Fat Off, and Running a Marathon For Dummies.

 Jason is a USA Track & Field certified coach, has taught USA Track & Field’s level 3 coaching certification, and has led elite coaching camps at the U.S. Olympic Training Center. A runner since sixth grade, he was a member of the silver-medal winning U.S. Masters Team at the 2013 World Maccabiah Games in Israel.

New Triathlete Tips:

Last week's discussion and Pulte tri clinic was on the topic of Essential Gear for Your First Triathlon.  We've published a blog post on the topic on the website.  Go to www.milehighendurance.com and the Content menu and navigate to MHE Blog.

At our Pulte group run last weekend I asked the peeps about what pace they wanted to run?  When they answered, I asked why they wanted to run the paces they were planning.  The answers were, "that's what I always run".  We ultimately ran a very slow and easy Zone 1 / Zone 2 pace.  As we ran, we discussed the reason for different paces or training zones.

This week's Clinic was going to be "How to Read Triathlon Workouts".  Everyone is receiving their free Triathlon Plans from MyTimeToTri.com.  If you are listening to this and need a free training plan, you should go check it out.   Not that my Pulte peeps have their training plans, and realizing that they don't yet understand the basics of training at different intensities, It thought I'd step back and talk about why the specifics of each swim, bike and run.

This week's blog posting is the "How's and Why's of Following a Triathlon Workout".  Here's a bit of what you will read on the blog post this weekend.

Workout Specifications

Notice that triathlon workouts rarely read “just go swim”, “ride your bike”, or “run somewhere and back”. They are (or should be) much more specific. If they are written by a certified triathlon coach, they should include specifics for duration (or distance), intensity, terrain (grade and/or surface), intervals and recovery, and potential skill focuses.

The specifics of a workout are designed to affect an adaptation. Different intensity levels, distances, terrain, sequencing and progression stress different energy systems and the neuromuscular system to affect different changes to your body.

Training Intensity

The “Training Zone Chart” refers to Zones that tie to a Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) range and description of how that may be perceived. Think of zones as gears in your cars transmission. 1st gear is the easiest (engine is doing less work) and slowest. 5th gear is the hardest (engine is doing a lot of work) and fastest.

Zone 1 as a training intensity is intended for active recovery. You are getting circulation and exercise, but it’s easy. Walking is a good example of Zone 1 effort.

Zone 2 intensity is designed to use your body’s aerobic energy system. This means that it’s primarily using your body’s ability to combine oxygen with fat to produce energy to fire your muscles. It does not put a high strain on your cardiovascular system. Lower intensity efforts are typically prescribed for longer distance and time efforts.

Zone 3 is the hardest you will work while using fat as your primary fuel source, but you are starting to use more glycogen (sugar) stored in your body’s muscles and liver to produce energy.

Zone 4 intensity is the tipping point where your body starts to use more glycogen for fuel than stored fat and instead shifts to and anaerobic adaptation. It also raises your heart rate drastically, influencing adaptations in your cardio-pulmonary system. You will often see interval training prescribed in 2-3 minute durations.

Zone 5 is designed for neuromuscular, or speed, development. Higher intensity efforts are typically prescribed in shorter “intervals”. You will typically see intervals prescribed in 20 second to 1 minute durations.

Training Endurance

Of the physical adaptations speed, strength and endurance, the latter is the easiest one for the body to make. Consider what it would take to decrease your 100-meter sprint by 10%, or bench press by 10%. Increasing your run distance from 1.0 to 1.1 miles is a relatively easy adaptation. If you consistently and progressively apply low intensity effort swim, bike and run efforts, you will be amazed how easily you are able to increase the distance of what you are capable of today and reach your goals, given adequate time. While you want to progressively increase your distance, you want to be careful to not add too much mileage too quickly. 5-10% increases each week is recommended to avoid injury.

Next week on MHE we have Josh Shadle on Fuelary - blood testing for the everyday superhero.  Whether your goal is weight loss or performance they have tests and plans that are design to make you happy, healthy, and …..horny. 

Our show is also supported by 303 Media Productions, including 303Triathlon and 303 Cycling, which are your resources for news and events on triathlon and cycling in Colorado.  Be sure to follow 303Radio.

Please support our affiliate brands that support the show and help you get faster!

  • The Halo Sport from Halo Neuroscience will help you learn the technique and form to get faster.  20 minutes of neural priming with the Halo Headset gives you an hour of neural plasticity to work and lock in the muscle movement that leads to strength, power and endurance.  Use code MHE150 to save $150.
  • Total Immersion -Use code MHETI10 to get 10% off items in your cart
  • Rudy Project has the helmets, glasses and gear to help you ride safe and look great.  Use code MHE30 to get 30% off your full price items.
  • TrainingPeaks Premium is the full featured version of the app.  Unlock the full featured app for 30 days using the code MHE30
  • All of these discounts can be found at milehighendurance on the Sponsors page.

If you are enjoying the show, please let us know by going on iTunes or your podcast player and giving us a review.  Be sure you are subscribed in iTunes so you get the show automatically downloaded on Saturday evening and recommend Mile High Endurance to a friend.  

Thanks again for listening to MHE.  Train well this week.  Stay tuned, stay informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

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